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Let {G = (G,+)} be a finite additive group. A tiling pair is a pair of non-empty subsets {A, B} such that every element of {G} can be written in exactly one way as a sum of an element {a} of {A} and an element {b} of {B}, in which case we write {G = A \oplus B}. The sets {A, B} are then called tiles, with {B} being a complementary tile to {A} and vice versa. For instance, every subgroup {H} of {G} is a tile, as one can pick one representative from each coset of {H} to form the complementary tile. Conversely, any set formed by taking one representative from each coset of {H} is also a tile.

Tiles can be quite complicated, particularly when the group {G} is “high-dimensional”. We will therefore restrict to the simple case of a cyclic group {G = {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}}, and restrict even further to the special case when the modulus {N} is square-free. Here, the situation should be much simpler. In particular, we have the following conjecture of Coven and Meyerowitz, which asserts that the previous construction of a tile is, in fact, the only such construction:

Conjecture 1 (Coven-Meyerowitz conjecture, square-free case) Let {N} be square-free, and let {A} be a tile of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}}. Then there exists a subgroup {H} of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} such that {A} consists of a single representative from each coset of {H}.

Note that in the square-free case, every subgroup {H} of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} has a complementary subgroup {H^\perp} (thus {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z} = H \oplus H^\perp}). In particular, {H} consists of a single representative from each coset of {H^\perp}, and so the examples of subgroups of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} are covered by the above conjecture in the square-free case.

In the non-square free case, the above assertion is not true; for instance, if {p} is a prime, then the multiples of {p} in {{\bf Z}/p^2{\bf Z}} are a tile, but cannot be formed from taking a single representative from all the cosets of a given subgroup. There is a more general conjecture of Coven and Meyerowitz to handle this more general case, although it is more difficult to state:

Conjecture 2 (Coven-Meyerowitz conjecture, general case) Let {N} be a natural number, and let {A} be a tile of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}}. Then there exists a set {S_A} of prime powers with {|A| = \prod_{p^j \in S_A} p} such that the Fourier transform

\displaystyle  \hat 1_A(k) := \sum_{n \in A} e^{2\pi i kn / N}

vanishes whenever {k} is a non-zero element of {{\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} whose order is the product of elements of {S_A} that are powers of distinct primes. Equivalently, the generating polynomial {\sum_{n \in A} x^n} is divisible by the cyclotomic polynomials {\phi_m} whenever {m} is the product of elements of {S_A} that are powers of distinct primes.

It can be shown (with a modest amount of effort) that Conjecture 2 implies Conjecture 1, but we will not do so here, focusing instead exclusively on the square-free case for simplicity.

It was observed by Laba that Conjecture 2 is connected to the following well-known conjecture of Fuglede:

Conjecture 3 (One-dimensional Fuglede conjecture, tiling to spectral direction) Let {E} be a compact subset of {{\bf R}} of positive measure which is a tile (thus {{\bf R} = E \oplus \Lambda} for some set {\Lambda \subset {\bf R}}). Then {L^2(E)} (with Lebesgue measure) has a spectrum, that is to say an orthogonal set of plane waves {x \mapsto e^{2\pi i \xi x}}.

Indeed, it was shown by Laba that Conjecture 2 implies Conjecture 3 in the case when {E} is the finite union of unit intervals. Actually, thanks to the more recent work of Farkas, Matolcsi, and Mora we know that Conjecture 2 in fact implies the universal spectrum conjecture of Lagarias and Wang, which in turn was known to imply Conjecture 3 in full generality. (On the other hand, the conjecture fails in four and higher dimensions; see the papers of Kolountzakis-Matolcsi and of Farkas-Revesz.)

Given the simple statement of Conjecture 1, it is perhaps somewhat surprising that it remains open, even in simple cases such as when {N} is the product of just four primes. One reason for this is that some plausible strengthenings of this conjecture (such as the Tijdeman-Sands conjecture) are known to be false, as we will review below. On the other hand, as we shall see, tiling sets have a lot of combinatorial structure, and in principle one should be able to work out a lot of special cases of the conjecture. Given the combinatorial nature of this problem, it may well be quite suitable for a polymath project in fact, if there is sufficient interest.

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