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I’ve just uploaded to the arXiv my paper The asymptotic distribution of a single eigenvalue gap of a Wigner matrix, submitted to Probability Theory and Related Fields. This paper (like several of my previous papers) is concerned with the asymptotic distribution of the eigenvalues {\lambda_1(M_n) \leq \ldots \leq \lambda_n(M_n)} of a random Wigner matrix {M_n} in the limit {n \rightarrow \infty}, with a particular focus on matrices drawn from the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE). This paper is focused on the bulk of the spectrum, i.e. to eigenvalues {\lambda_i(M_n)} with {\delta n \leq i \leq (1-\delta) i n} for some fixed {\delta>0}.

The location of an individual eigenvalue {\lambda_i(M_n)} is by now quite well understood. If we normalise the entries of the matrix {M_n} to have mean zero and variance {1}, then in the asymptotic limit {n \rightarrow \infty}, the Wigner semicircle law tells us that with probability {1-o(1)} one has

\displaystyle  \lambda_i(M_n) =\sqrt{n} u + o(\sqrt{n})

where the classical location {u = u_{i/n} \in [-2,2]} of the eigenvalue is given by the formula

\displaystyle  \int_{-2}^{u} \rho_{sc}(x)\ dx = \frac{i}{n}

and the semicircular distribution {\rho_{sc}(x)\ dx} is given by the formula

\displaystyle  \rho_{sc}(x) := \frac{1}{2\pi} (4-x^2)_+^{1/2}.

Actually, one can improve the error term here from {o(\sqrt{n})} to {O( \log^{1/2+\epsilon} n)} for any {\epsilon>0} (see this previous recent paper of Van and myself for more discussion of these sorts of estimates, sometimes known as eigenvalue rigidity estimates).

From the semicircle law (and the fundamental theorem of calculus), one expects the {i^{th}} eigenvalue spacing {\lambda_{i+1}(M_n)-\lambda_i(M_n)} to have an average size of {\frac{1}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}}. It is thus natural to introduce the normalised eigenvalue spacing

\displaystyle  X_i := \frac{\lambda_{i+1}(M_n) - \lambda_i(M_n)}{1/\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}

and ask what the distribution of {X_i} is.

As mentioned previously, we will focus on the bulk case {\delta n \leq i\leq (1-\delta)n}, and begin with the model case when {M_n} is drawn from GUE. (In the edge case when {i} is close to {1} or to {n}, the distribution is given by the famous Tracy-Widom law.) Here, the distribution was almost (but as we shall see, not quite) worked out by Gaudin and Mehta. By using the theory of determinantal processes, they were able to compute a quantity closely related to {X_i}, namely the probability

\displaystyle  {\bf P}( N_{[\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}, \sqrt{n} u + \frac{y}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}]} = 0) \ \ \ \ \ (1)

that an interval {[\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}, \sqrt{n} u + \frac{y}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}]} near {\sqrt{n} u} of length comparable to the expected eigenvalue spacing {1/\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)} is devoid of eigenvalues. For {u} in the bulk and fixed {x,y}, they showed that this probability is equal to

\displaystyle  \det( 1 - 1_{[x,y]} P 1_{[x,y]} ) + o(1),

where {P} is the Dyson projection

\displaystyle  P f(x) = \int_{\bf R} \frac{\sin(\pi(x-y))}{\pi(x-y)} f(y)\ dy

to Fourier modes in {[-1/2,1/2]}, and {\det} is the Fredholm determinant. As shown by Jimbo, Miwa, Tetsuji, Mori, and Sato, this determinant can also be expressed in terms of a solution to a Painleve V ODE, though we will not need this fact here. In view of this asymptotic and some standard integration by parts manipulations, it becomes plausible to propose that {X_i} will be asymptotically distributed according to the Gaudin-Mehta distribution {p(x)\ dx}, where

\displaystyle  p(x) := \frac{d^2}{dx^2} \det( 1 - 1_{[0,x]} P 1_{[0,x]} ).

A reasonably accurate approximation for {p} is given by the Wigner surmise {p(x) \approx \frac{1}{2} \pi x e^{-\pi x^2/4}}, which was presciently proposed by Wigner as early as 1957; it is exact for {n=2} but not in the asymptotic limit {n \rightarrow \infty}.

Unfortunately, when one tries to make this argument rigorous, one finds that the asymptotic for (1) does not control a single gap {X_i}, but rather an ensemble of gaps {X_i}, where {i} is drawn from an interval {[i_0 - L, i_0 + L]} of some moderate size {L} (e.g. {L = \log n}); see for instance this paper of Deift, Kriecherbauer, McLaughlin, Venakides, and Zhou for a more precise formalisation of this statement (which is phrased slightly differently, in which one samples all gaps inside a fixed window of spectrum, rather than inside a fixed range of eigenvalue indices {i}). (This result is stated for GUE, but can be extended to other Wigner ensembles by the Four Moment Theorem, at least if one assumes a moment matching condition; see this previous paper with Van Vu for details. The moment condition can in fact be removed, as was done in this subsequent paper with Erdos, Ramirez, Schlein, Vu, and Yau.)

The problem is that when one specifies a given window of spectrum such as {[\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}, \sqrt{n} u + \frac{y}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)}]}, one cannot quite pin down in advance which eigenvalues {\lambda_i(M_n)} are going to lie to the left or right of this window; even with the strongest eigenvalue rigidity results available, there is a natural uncertainty of {\sqrt{\log n}} or so in the {i} index (as can be quantified quite precisely by this central limit theorem of Gustavsson).

The main difficulty here is that there could potentially be some strange coupling between the event (1) of an interval being devoid of eigenvalues, and the number {N_{(-\infty,\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)})}(M_n)} of eigenvalues to the left of that interval. For instance, one could conceive of a possible scenario in which the interval in (1) tends to have many eigenvalues when {N_{(-\infty,\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)})}(M_n)} is even, but very few when {N_{(-\infty,\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)})}(M_n)} is odd. In this sort of situation, the gaps {X_i} may have different behaviour for even {i} than for odd {i}, and such anomalies would not be picked up in the averaged statistics in which {i} is allowed to range over some moderately large interval.

The main result of the current paper is that these anomalies do not actually occur, and that all of the eigenvalue gaps {X_i} in the bulk are asymptotically governed by the Gaudin-Mehta law without the need for averaging in the {i} parameter. Again, this is shown first for GUE, and then extended to other Wigner matrices obeying a matching moment condition using the Four Moment Theorem. (It is likely that the moment matching condition can be removed here, but I was unable to achieve this, despite all the recent advances in establishing universality of local spectral statistics for Wigner matrices, mainly because the universality results in the literature are more focused on specific energy levels {u} than on specific eigenvalue indices {i}. To make matters worse, in some cases universality is currently known only after an additional averaging in the energy parameter.)

The main task in the proof is to show that the random variable {N_{(-\infty,\sqrt{n} u + \frac{x}{\sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(u)})}(M_n)} is largely decoupled from the event in (1) when {M_n} is drawn from GUE. To do this we use some of the theory of determinantal processes, and in particular the nice fact that when one conditions a determinantal process to the event that a certain spatial region (such as an interval) contains no points of the process, then one obtains a new determinantal process (with a kernel that is closely related to the original kernel). The main task is then to obtain a sufficiently good control on the distance between the new determinantal kernel and the old one, which we do by some functional-analytic considerations involving the manipulation of norms of operators (and specifically, the operator norm, Hilbert-Schmidt norm, and nuclear norm). Amusingly, the Fredholm alternative makes a key appearance, as I end up having to invert a compact perturbation of the identity at one point (specifically, I need to invert {1 - 1_{[x,y]}P1_{[x,y]}}, where {P} is the Dyson projection and {[x,y]} is an interval). As such, the bounds in my paper become ineffective, though I am sure that with more work one can invert this particular perturbation of the identity by hand, without the need to invoke the Fredholm alternative.

Van Vu and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our paper “Random matrices: The Universality phenomenon for Wigner ensembles“. This survey is a longer version (58 pages) of a previous short survey we wrote up a few months ago. The survey focuses on recent progress in understanding the universality phenomenon for Hermitian Wigner ensembles, of which the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE) is the most well known. The one-sentence summary of this progress is that many of the asymptotic spectral statistics (e.g. correlation functions, eigenvalue gaps, determinants, etc.) that were previously known for GUE matrices, are now known for very large classes of Wigner ensembles as well. There are however a wide variety of results of this type, due to the large number of interesting spectral statistics, the varying hypotheses placed on the ensemble, and the different modes of convergence studied, and it is difficult to isolate a single such result currently as the definitive universality result. (In particular, there is at present a tradeoff between generality of ensemble and strength of convergence; the universality results that are available for the most general classes of ensemble are only presently able to demonstrate a rather weak sense of convergence to the universal distribution (involving an additional averaging in the energy parameter), which limits the applicability of such results to a number of interesting questions in which energy averaging is not permissible, such as the study of the least singular value of a Wigner matrix, or of related quantities such as the condition number or determinant. But it is conceivable that this tradeoff is a temporary phenomenon and may be eliminated by future work in this area; in the case of Hermitian matrices whose entries have the same second moments as that of the GUE ensemble, for instance, the need for energy averaging has already been removed.)

Nevertheless, throughout the family of results that have been obtained recently, there are two main methods which have been fundamental to almost all of the recent progress in extending from special ensembles such as GUE to general ensembles. The first method, developed extensively by Erdos, Schlein, Yau, Yin, and others (and building on an initial breakthrough by Johansson), is the heat flow method, which exploits the rapid convergence to equilibrium of the spectral statistics of matrices undergoing Dyson-type flows towards GUE. (An important aspect to this method is the ability to accelerate the convergence to equilibrium by localising the Hamiltonian, in order to eliminate the slowest modes of the flow; this refinement of the method is known as the “local relaxation flow” method. Unfortunately, the translation mode is not accelerated by this process, which is the principal reason why results obtained by pure heat flow methods still require an energy averaging in the final conclusion; it would of interest to find a way around this difficulty.) The other method, which goes all the way back to Lindeberg in his classical proof of the central limit theorem, and which was introduced to random matrix theory by Chatterjee and then developed for the universality problem by Van Vu and myself, is the swapping method, which is based on the observation that spectral statistics of Wigner matrices tend to be stable if one replaces just one or two entries of the matrix with another distribution, with the stability of the swapping process becoming stronger if one assumes that the old and new entries have many matching moments. The main formalisations of this observation are known as four moment theorems, because they require four matching moments between the entries, although there are some variant three moment theorems and two moment theorems in the literature as well. Our initial four moment theorems were focused on individual eigenvalues (and later also to eigenvectors), but it was later observed by Erdos, Yau, and Yin that simpler four moment theorems could also be established for aggregate spectral statistics, such as the coefficients of the Greens function, and Knowles and Yin also subsequently observed that these latter theorems could be used to recover a four moment theorem for eigenvalues and eigenvectors, giving an alternate approach to proving such theorems.

Interestingly, it seems that the heat flow and swapping methods are complementary to each other; the heat flow methods are good at removing moment hypotheses on the coefficients, while the swapping methods are good at removing regularity hypotheses. To handle general ensembles with minimal moment or regularity hypotheses, it is thus necessary to combine the two methods (though perhaps in the future a third method, or a unification of the two existing methods, might emerge).

Besides the heat flow and swapping methods, there are also a number of other basic tools that are also needed in these results, such as local semicircle laws and eigenvalue rigidity, which are also discussed in the survey. We also survey how universality has been established for wide variety of spectral statistics; the {k}-point correlation functions are the most well known of these statistics, but they do not tell the whole story (particularly if one can only control these functions after an averaging in the energy), and there are a number of other statistics, such as eigenvalue counting functions, determinants, or spectral gaps, for which the above methods can be applied.

In order to prevent the survey from becoming too enormous, we decided to restrict attention to Hermitian matrix ensembles, whose entries off the diagonal are identically distributed, as this is the case in which the strongest results are available. There are several results that are applicable to more general ensembles than these which are briefly mentioned in the survey, but they are not covered in detail.

We plan to submit this survey eventually to the proceedings of a workshop on random matrix theory, and will continue to update the references on the arXiv version until the time comes to actually submit the paper.

Finally, in the survey we issue some errata for previous papers of Van and myself in this area, mostly centering around the three moment theorem (a variant of the more widely used four moment theorem), for which the original proof of Van and myself was incomplete. (Fortunately, as the three moment theorem had many fewer applications than the four moment theorem, and most of the applications that it did have ended up being superseded by subsequent papers, the actual impact of this issue was limited, but still an erratum is in order.)

Van Vu and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our short survey article, “Random matrices: The Four Moment Theorem for Wigner ensembles“, submitted to the MSRI book series, as part of the proceedings on the MSRI semester program on random matrix theory from last year.  This is a highly condensed version (at 17 pages) of a much longer survey (currently at about 48 pages, though not completely finished) that we are currently working on, devoted to the recent advances in understanding the universality phenomenon for spectral statistics of Wigner matrices.  In this abridged version of the survey, we focus on a key tool in the subject, namely the Four Moment Theorem which roughly speaking asserts that the statistics of a Wigner matrix depend only on the first four moments of the entries.  We give a sketch of proof of this theorem, and two sample applications: a central limit theorem for individual eigenvalues of a Wigner matrix (extending a result of Gustavsson in the case of GUE), and the verification of a conjecture of Wigner, Dyson, and Mehta on the universality of the asymptotic k-point correlation functions even for discrete ensembles (provided that we interpret convergence in the vague topology sense).

For reasons of space, this paper is very far from an exhaustive survey even of the narrow topic of universality for Wigner matrices, but should hopefully be an accessible entry point into the subject nevertheless.

Now that we have developed the basic probabilistic tools that we will need, we now turn to the main subject of this course, namely the study of random matrices. There are many random matrix models (aka matrix ensembles) of interest – far too many to all be discussed in a single course. We will thus focus on just a few simple models. First of all, we shall restrict attention to square matrices {M = (\xi_{ij})_{1 \leq i,j \leq n}}, where {n} is a (large) integer and the {\xi_{ij}} are real or complex random variables. (One can certainly study rectangular matrices as well, but for simplicity we will only look at the square case.) Then, we shall restrict to three main models:

  • Iid matrix ensembles, in which the coefficients {\xi_{ij}} are iid random variables with a single distribution {\xi_{ij} \equiv \xi}. We will often normalise {\xi} to have mean zero and unit variance. Examples of iid models include the Bernouli ensemble (aka random sign matrices) in which the {\xi_{ij}} are signed Bernoulli variables, the real gaussian matrix ensemble in which {\xi_{ij} \equiv N(0,1)_{\bf R}}, and the complex gaussian matrix ensemble in which {\xi_{ij} \equiv N(0,1)_{\bf C}}.
  • Symmetric Wigner matrix ensembles, in which the upper triangular coefficients {\xi_{ij}}, {j \geq i} are jointly independent and real, but the lower triangular coefficients {\xi_{ij}}, {j<i} are constrained to equal their transposes: {\xi_{ij}=\xi_{ji}}. Thus {M} by construction is always a real symmetric matrix. Typically, the strictly upper triangular coefficients will be iid, as will the diagonal coefficients, but the two classes of coefficients may have a different distribution. One example here is the symmetric Bernoulli ensemble, in which both the strictly upper triangular and the diagonal entries are signed Bernoulli variables; another important example is the Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE), in which the upper triangular entries have distribution {N(0,1)_{\bf R}} and the diagonal entries have distribution {N(0,2)_{\bf R}}. (We will explain the reason for this discrepancy later.)
  • Hermitian Wigner matrix ensembles, in which the upper triangular coefficients are jointly independent, with the diagonal entries being real and the strictly upper triangular entries complex, and the lower triangular coefficients {\xi_{ij}}, {j<i} are constrained to equal their adjoints: {\xi_{ij} = \overline{\xi_{ji}}}. Thus {M} by construction is always a Hermitian matrix. This class of ensembles contains the symmetric Wigner ensembles as a subclass. Another very important example is the Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE), in which all off-diagional entries have distribution {N(0,1)_{\bf C}}, but the diagonal entries have distribution {N(0,1)_{\bf R}}.

Given a matrix ensemble {M}, there are many statistics of {M} that one may wish to consider, e.g. the eigenvalues or singular values of {M}, the trace and determinant, etc. In these notes we will focus on a basic statistic, namely the operator norm

\displaystyle  \| M \|_{op} := \sup_{x \in {\bf C}^n: |x|=1} |Mx| \ \ \ \ \ (1)

of the matrix {M}. This is an interesting quantity in its own right, but also serves as a basic upper bound on many other quantities. (For instance, {\|M\|_{op}} is also the largest singular value {\sigma_1(M)} of {M} and thus dominates the other singular values; similarly, all eigenvalues {\lambda_i(M)} of {M} clearly have magnitude at most {\|M\|_{op}}.) Because of this, it is particularly important to get good upper tail bounds

\displaystyle  {\bf P}( \|M\|_{op} \geq \lambda ) \leq \ldots

on this quantity, for various thresholds {\lambda}. (Lower tail bounds are also of interest, of course; for instance, they give us confidence that the upper tail bounds are sharp.) Also, as we shall see, the problem of upper bounding {\|M\|_{op}} can be viewed as a non-commutative analogue of upper bounding the quantity {|S_n|} studied in Notes 1. (The analogue of the central limit theorem in Notes 2 is the Wigner semi-circular law, which will be studied in the next set of notes.)

An {n \times n} matrix consisting entirely of {1}s has an operator norm of exactly {n}, as can for instance be seen from the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. More generally, any matrix whose entries are all uniformly {O(1)} will have an operator norm of {O(n)} (which can again be seen from Cauchy-Schwarz, or alternatively from Schur’s test, or from a computation of the Frobenius norm). However, this argument does not take advantage of possible cancellations in {M}. Indeed, from analogy with concentration of measure, when the entries of the matrix {M} are independent, bounded and have mean zero, we expect the operator norm to be of size {O(\sqrt{n})} rather than {O(n)}. We shall see shortly that this intuition is indeed correct. (One can see, though, that the mean zero hypothesis is important; from the triangle inequality we see that if we add the all-ones matrix (for instance) to a random matrix with mean zero, to obtain a random matrix whose coefficients all have mean {1}, then at least one of the two random matrices necessarily has operator norm at least {n/2}.)

As mentioned before, there is an analogy here with the concentration of measure phenomenon, and many of the tools used in the latter (e.g. the moment method) will also appear here. (Indeed, we will be able to use some of the concentration inequalities from Notes 1 directly to help control {\|M\|_{op}} and related quantities.) Similarly, just as many of the tools from concentration of measure could be adapted to help prove the central limit theorem, several the tools seen here will be of use in deriving the semi-circular law.

The most advanced knowledge we have on the operator norm is given by the Tracy-Widom law, which not only tells us where the operator norm is concentrated in (it turns out, for instance, that for a Wigner matrix (with some additional technical assumptions), it is concentrated in the range {[2\sqrt{n} - O(n^{-1/6}), 2\sqrt{n} + O(n^{-1/6})]}), but what its distribution in that range is. While the methods in this set of notes can eventually be pushed to establish this result, this is far from trivial, and will only be briefly discussed here. (We may return to the Tracy-Widom law later in this course, though.)

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Van Vu and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our paper “Random matrices: universality of local eigenvalue statistics“, submitted to Acta Math..  This paper concerns the eigenvalues \lambda_1(M_n) \leq \ldots \leq \lambda_n(M_n) of a Wigner matrix M_n = (\zeta_{ij})_{1 \leq i,j \leq n}, which we define to be a random Hermitian n \times n matrix whose upper-triangular entries \zeta_{ij}, 1 \leq i \leq j \leq n are independent (and whose strictly upper-triangular entries \zeta_{ij}, 1 \leq i < j \leq n are also identically distributed).  [The lower-triangular entries are of course determined from the upper-triangular ones by the Hermitian property.]  We normalise the matrices so that all the entries have mean zero and variance 1.  Basic examples of Wigner Hermitian matrices include

  1. The Gaussian Unitary Ensemble (GUE), in which the upper-triangular entries \zeta_{ij}, i<j are complex gaussian, and the diagonal entries \zeta_{ii} are real gaussians;
  2. The Gaussian Orthogonal Ensemble (GOE), in which all entries are real gaussian;
  3. The Bernoulli Ensemble, in which all entries take values \pm 1 (with equal probability of each).

We will make a further distinction into Wigner real symmetric matrices (which are Wigner matrices with real coefficients, such as GOE and the Bernoulli ensemble) and Wigner Hermitian matrices (which are Wigner matrices whose upper-triangular coefficients have real and imaginary parts iid, such as GUE).

The GUE and GOE ensembles have a rich algebraic structure (for instance, the GUE distribution is invariant under conjugation by unitary matrices, while the GOE distribution is similarly invariant under conjugation by orthogonal matrices, hence the terminology), and as a consequence their eigenvalue distribution can be computed explicitly.  For instance, the joint distribution of the eigenvalues \lambda_1(M_n),\ldots,\lambda_n(M_n) for GUE is given by the explicit formula

\displaystyle C_n \prod_{1 \leq i<j \leq n} |\lambda_i-\lambda_j|^2 \exp( - \frac{1}{2n} (\lambda_1^2+\ldots+\lambda_n^2))\ d\lambda_1 \ldots d\lambda_n (0)

for some explicitly computable constant C_n on the orthant \{ \lambda_1 \leq \ldots \leq \lambda_n\} (a result first established by Ginibre).  (A similar formula exists for GOE, but for simplicity we will just discuss GUE here.)  Using this explicit formula one can compute a wide variety of asymptotic eigenvalue statistics.  For instance, the (bulk) empirical spectral distribution (ESD) measure \frac{1}{n} \sum_{i=1}^n \delta_{\lambda_i(M_n)/\sqrt{n}} for GUE (and indeed for all Wigner matrices, see below) is known to converge (in the vague sense) to the Wigner semicircular law

\displaystyle \frac{1}{2\pi} (4-x^2)_+^{1/2}\ dx =: \rho_{sc}(x)\ dx (1)

as n \to \infty.  Actually, more precise statements are known for GUE; for instance, for 1 \leq i \leq n, the i^{th} eigenvalue \lambda_i(M_n) is known to equal

\displaystyle \lambda_i(M_n) = \sqrt{n} t(\frac{i}{n}) + O( \frac{\log n}{n} ) (2)

with probability 1-o(1), where t(a) \in [-2,2] is the inverse cumulative distribution function of the semicircular law, thus

\displaystyle a = \int_{-2}^{t(a)} \rho_{sc}(x)\ dx.

Furthermore, the distribution of the normalised eigenvalue spacing \sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(\frac{i}{n}) (\lambda_{i+1}(M_n) - \lambda_i(M_n)) is known; in the bulk region \varepsilon n \leq i \leq 1-\varepsilon n for fixed \varepsilon > 0, it converges as n \to \infty to the Gaudin distribution, which can be described explicitly in terms of determinants of the Dyson sine kernel K(x,y) := \frac{\sin \pi(x-y)}{\pi(x-y)}.  Many further local statistics of the eigenvalues of GUE are in fact governed by this sine kernel, a result usually proven using the asymptotics of orthogonal polynomials (and specifically, the Hermite polynomials).  (At the edge of the spectrum, say i = n-O(1), the asymptotic distribution is a bit different, being governed instead by the  Tracy-Widom law.)

It has been widely believed that these GUE facts enjoy a universality property, in the sense that they should also hold for wide classes of other matrix models. In particular, Wigner matrices should enjoy the same bulk distribution (1), the same asymptotic law (2) for individual eigenvalues, and the same sine kernel statistics as GUE. (The statistics for Wigner symmetric matrices are slightly different, and should obey GOE statistics rather than GUE ones.)

There has been a fair body of evidence to support this belief.  The bulk distribution (1) is in fact valid for all Wigner matrices (a result of Pastur, building on the original work of Wigner of course).  The Tracy-Widom statistics on the edge were established for all Wigner Hermitian matrices (assuming that the coefficients had a distribution which was symmetric and decayed exponentially) by Soshnikov (with some further refinements by Soshnikov and Peche).  Soshnikov’s arguments were based on an advanced version of the moment method.

The sine kernel statistics were established by Johansson for Wigner Hermitian matrices which were gaussian divisible, which means that they could be expressed as a non-trivial linear combination of another Wigner Hermitian matrix and an independent GUE.  (Basically, this means that distribution of the coefficients is a convolution of some other distribution with a gaussian.  There were some additional technical decay conditions in Johansson’s work which were removed in subsequent work of Ben Arous and Peche.)   Johansson’s work was based on an explicit formula for the joint distribution for gauss divisible matrices that generalises (0) (but is significantly more complicated).

Just last week, Erdos, Ramirez, Schlein, and Yau established sine kernel statistics for Wigner Hermitian matrices with exponential decay and a high degree of smoothness (roughly speaking, they require  control of up to six derivatives of the Radon-Nikodym derivative of the distribution).  Their method is based on an analysis of the dynamics of the eigenvalues under a smooth transition from a general Wigner Hermitian matrix to GUE, essentially a matrix version of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process, whose eigenvalue dynamics are governed by Dyson Brownian motion.

In my paper with Van, we establish similar results to that of Erdos et al. under slightly different hypotheses, and by a somewhat different method.  Informally, our main result is as follows:

Theorem 1. (Informal version)  Suppose M_n is a Wigner Hermitian matrix whose coefficients have an exponentially decaying distribution, and whose real and imaginary parts are supported on at least three points (basically, this excludes Bernoulli-type distributions only) and have vanishing third moment (which is for instance the case for symmetric distributions).  Then one has the local statistics (2) (but with an error term of O(n^{-1+\delta}) for any \delta>0 rather than O(\log n/n)) and the sine kernel statistics for individual eigenvalue spacings \sqrt{n} \rho_{sc}(\frac{i}{n}) (\lambda_{i+1}(M_n) - \lambda_i(M_n)) (as well as higher order correlations) in the bulk.

If one removes the vanishing third moment hypothesis, one still has the sine kernel statistics provided one averages over all i.

There are analogous results for Wigner real symmetric matrices (see paper for details).  There are also some related results, such as a universal distribution for the least singular value of matrices of the form in Theorem 1, and a crude asymptotic for the determinant (in particular, \log |\det M_n| = (1+o(1)) \log \sqrt{n!} with probability 1-o(1)).

The arguments are based primarily on the Lindeberg replacement strategy, which Van and I also used to obtain universality for the circular law for iid matrices, and for the least singular value for iid matrices, but also rely on other tools, such as some recent arguments of Erdos, Schlein, and Yau, as well as a very useful concentration inequality of Talagrand which lets us tackle both discrete and continuous matrix ensembles in a unified manner.  (I plan to talk about Talagrand’s inequality in my next blog post.)

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