You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Gowers uniformity norms’ tag.

Ben Green and I have updated our paper “An arithmetic regularity lemma, an associated counting lemma, and applications” to account for a somewhat serious issue with the paper that was pointed out to us recently by Daniel Altman. This paper contains two core theorems:

  • An “arithmetic regularity lemma” that, roughly speaking, decomposes an arbitrary bounded sequence {f(n)} on an interval {\{1,\dots,N\}} as an “irrational nilsequence” {F(g(n) \Gamma)} of controlled complexity, plus some “negligible” errors (where one uses the Gowers uniformity norm as the main norm to control the neglibility of the error); and
  • An “arithmetic counting lemma” that gives an asymptotic formula for counting various averages {{\mathbb E}_{{\bf n} \in {\bf Z}^d \cap P} f(\psi_1({\bf n})) \dots f(\psi_t({\bf n}))} for various affine-linear forms {\psi_1,\dots,\psi_t} when the functions {f} are given by irrational nilsequences.

The combination of the two theorems is then used to address various questions in additive combinatorics.

There are no direct issues with the arithmetic regularity lemma. However, it turns out that the arithmetic counting lemma is only true if one imposes an additional property (which we call the “flag property”) on the affine-linear forms {\psi_1,\dots,\psi_t}. Without this property, there does not appear to be a clean asymptotic formula for these averages if the only hypothesis one places on the underlying nilsequences is irrationality. Thus when trying to understand the asymptotics of averages involving linear forms that do not obey the flag property, the paradigm of understanding these averages via a combination of the regularity lemma and a counting lemma seems to require some significant revision (in particular, one would probably have to replace the existing regularity lemma with some variant, despite the fact that the lemma is still technically true in this setting). Fortunately, for most applications studied to date (including the important subclass of translation-invariant affine forms), the flag property holds; however our claim in the paper to have resolved a conjecture of Gowers and Wolf on the true complexity of systems of affine forms must now be narrowed, as our methods only verify this conjecture under the assumption of the flag property.

In a bit more detail: the asymptotic formula for our counting lemma involved some finite-dimensional vector spaces {\Psi^{[i]}} for various natural numbers {i}, defined as the linear span of the vectors {(\psi^i_1({\bf n}), \dots, \psi^i_t({\bf n}))} as {{\bf n}} ranges over the parameter space {{\bf Z}^d}. Roughly speaking, these spaces encode some constraints one would expect to see amongst the forms {\psi^i_1({\bf n}), \dots, \psi^i_t({\bf n})}. For instance, in the case of length four arithmetic progressions when {d=2}, {{\bf n} = (n,r)}, and

\displaystyle  \psi_i({\bf n}) = n + (i-1)r

for {i=1,2,3,4}, then {\Psi^{[1]}} is spanned by the vectors {(1,1,1,1)} and {(1,2,3,4)} and can thus be described as the two-dimensional linear space

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[1]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): a-2b+c = b-2c+d = 0\} \ \ \ \ \ (1)

while {\Psi^{[2]}} is spanned by the vectors {(1,1,1,1)}, {(1,2,3,4)}, {(1^2,2^2,3^2,4^2)} and can be described as the hyperplane

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[2]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): a-3b+3c-d = 0 \}. \ \ \ \ \ (2)

As a special case of the counting lemma, we can check that if {f} takes the form {f(n) = F( \alpha n, \beta n^2 + \gamma n)} for some irrational {\alpha,\beta \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, some arbitrary {\gamma \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, and some smooth {F: {\bf R}/{\bf Z} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf C}}, then the limiting value of the average

\displaystyle  {\bf E}_{n, r \in [N]} f(n) f(n+r) f(n+2r) f(n+3r)

as {N \rightarrow \infty} is equal to

\displaystyle  \int_{a_1,b_1,c_1,d_1 \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: a_1-2b_1+c_1=b_1-2c_1+d_1=0} \int_{a_2,b_2,c_2,d_2 \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: a_2-3b_2+3c_2-d_2=0}

\displaystyle  F(a_1,a_2) F(b_1,b_2) F(c_1,c_2) F(d_1,d_2)

which reflects the constraints

\displaystyle  \alpha n - 2 \alpha(n+r) + \alpha(n+2r) = \alpha(n+r) - 2\alpha(n+2r)+\alpha(n+3r)=0

and

\displaystyle  (\beta n^2 + \gamma n) - 3 (\beta(n+r)^2+\gamma(n+r))

\displaystyle + 3 (\beta(n+2r)^2 +\gamma(n+2r)) - (\beta(n+3r)^2+\gamma(n+3r))=0.

These constraints follow from the descriptions (1), (2), using the containment {\Psi^{[1]} \subset \Psi^{[2]}} to dispense with the lower order term {\gamma n} (which then plays no further role in the analysis).

The arguments in our paper turn out to be perfectly correct under the assumption of the “flag property” that {\Psi^{[i]} \subset \Psi^{[i+1]}} for all {i}. The problem is that the flag property turns out to not always hold. A counterexample, provided by Daniel Altman, involves the four linear forms

\displaystyle  \psi_1(n,r) = r; \psi_2(n,r) = 2n+2r; \psi_3(n,r) = n+3r; \psi_4(n,r) = n.

Here it turns out that

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[1]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): d-c=3a; b-2a=2d\}

and

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[2]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): 24a+3b-4c-8d=0 \}

and {\Psi^{[1]}} is no longer contained in {\Psi^{[2]}}. The analogue of the asymptotic formula given previously for {f(n) = F( \alpha n, \beta n^2 + \gamma n)} is then valid when {\gamma} vanishes, but not when {\gamma} is non-zero, because the identity

\displaystyle  24 (\beta \psi_1(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_1(n,r)) + 3 (\beta \psi_2(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_2(n,r))

\displaystyle - 4 (\beta \psi_3(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_3(n,r)) - 8 (\beta \psi_4(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_4(n,r)) = 0

holds in the former case but not the latter. Thus the output of any purported arithmetic regularity lemma in this case is now sensitive to the lower order terms of the nilsequence and cannot be described in a uniform fashion for all “irrational” sequences. There should still be some sort of formula for the asymptotics from the general equidistribution theory of nilsequences, but it could be considerably more complicated than what is presented in this paper.

Fortunately, the flag property does hold in several key cases, most notably the translation invariant case when {\Psi^{[1]}} contains {(1,\dots,1)}, as well as “complexity one” cases. Nevertheless non-flag property systems of affine forms do exist, thus limiting the range of applicability of the techniques in this paper. In particular, the conjecture of Gowers and Wolf (Theorem 1.13 in the paper) is now open again in the non-flag property case.

Kaisa Matomäki, Maksym Radziwill, Joni Teräväinen, Tamar Ziegler and I have uploaded to the arXiv our paper Higher uniformity of bounded multiplicative functions in short intervals on average. This paper (which originated from a working group at an AIM workshop on Sarnak’s conjecture) focuses on the local Fourier uniformity conjecture for bounded multiplicative functions such as the Liouville function {\lambda}. One form of this conjecture is the assertion that

\displaystyle  \int_0^X \| \lambda \|_{U^k([x,x+H])}\ dx = o(X) \ \ \ \ \ (1)

as {X \rightarrow \infty} for any fixed {k \geq 0} and any {H = H(X) \leq X} that goes to infinity as {X \rightarrow \infty}, where {U^k([x,x+H])} is the (normalized) Gowers uniformity norm. Among other things this conjecture implies (logarithmically averaged version of) the Chowla and Sarnak conjectures for the Liouville function (or the Möbius function), see this previous blog post.

The conjecture gets more difficult as {k} increases, and also becomes more difficult the more slowly {H} grows with {X}. The {k=0} conjecture is equivalent to the assertion

\displaystyle  \int_0^X |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n)| \ dx = o(HX)

which was proven (for arbitrarily slowly growing {H}) in a landmark paper of Matomäki and Radziwill, discussed for instance in this blog post.

For {k=1}, the conjecture is equivalent to the assertion

\displaystyle  \int_0^X \sup_\alpha |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n) e(-\alpha n)| \ dx = o(HX). \ \ \ \ \ (2)

This remains open for sufficiently slowly growing {H} (and it would be a major breakthrough in particular if one could obtain this bound for {H} as small as {\log^\varepsilon X} for any fixed {\varepsilon>0}, particularly if applicable to more general bounded multiplicative functions than {\lambda}, as this would have new implications for a generalization of the Chowla conjecture known as the Elliott conjecture). Recently, Kaisa, Maks and myself were able to establish this conjecture in the range {H \geq X^\varepsilon} (in fact we have since worked out in the current paper that we can get {H} as small as {\exp(\log^{5/8+\varepsilon} X)}). In our current paper we establish Fourier uniformity conjecture for higher {k} for the same range of {H}. This in particular implies local orthogonality to polynomial phases,

\displaystyle  \int_0^X \sup_{P \in \mathrm{Poly}_{\leq k-1}({\bf R} \rightarrow {\bf R})} |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n) e(-P(n))| \ dx = o(HX) \ \ \ \ \ (3)

where {\mathrm{Poly}_{\leq k-1}({\bf R} \rightarrow {\bf R})} denotes the polynomials of degree at most {k-1}, but the full conjecture is a bit stronger than this, establishing the more general statement

\displaystyle  \int_0^X \sup_{g \in \mathrm{Poly}({\bf R} \rightarrow G)} |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma)| \ dx = o(HX) \ \ \ \ \ (4)

for any degree {k} filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} and Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf C}}, where {g} now ranges over polynomial maps from {{\bf R}} to {G}. The method of proof follows the same general strategy as in the previous paper with Kaisa and Maks. (The equivalence of (4) and (1) follows from the inverse conjecture for the Gowers norms, proven in this paper.) We quickly sketch first the proof of (3), using very informal language to avoid many technicalities regarding the precise quantitative form of various estimates. If the estimate (3) fails, then we have the correlation estimate

\displaystyle  |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n) e(-P_x(n))| \gg H

for many {x \sim X} and some polynomial {P_x} depending on {x}. The difficulty here is to understand how {P_x} can depend on {x}. We write the above correlation estimate more suggestively as

\displaystyle  \lambda(n) \sim_{[x,x+H]} e(P_x(n)).

Because of the multiplicativity {\lambda(np) = -\lambda(p)} at small primes {p}, one expects to have a relation of the form

\displaystyle  e(P_{x'}(p'n)) \sim_{[x/p,x/p+H/p]} e(P_x(pn)) \ \ \ \ \ (5)

for many {x,x'} for which {x/p \approx x'/p'} for some small primes {p,p'}. (This can be formalised using an inequality of Elliott related to the Turan-Kubilius theorem.) This gives a relationship between {P_x} and {P_{x'}} for “edges” {x,x'} in a rather sparse “graph” connecting the elements of say {[X/2,X]}. Using some graph theory one can locate some non-trivial “cycles” in this graph that eventually lead (in conjunction to a certain technical but important “Chinese remainder theorem” step to modify the {P_x} to eliminate a rather serious “aliasing” issue that was already discussed in this previous post) to obtain functional equations of the form

\displaystyle  P_x(a_x \cdot) \approx P_x(b_x \cdot)

for some large and close (but not identical) integers {a_x,b_x}, where {\approx} should be viewed as a first approximation (ignoring a certain “profinite” or “major arc” term for simplicity) as “differing by a slowly varying polynomial” and the polynomials {P_x} should now be viewed as taking values on the reals rather than the integers. This functional equation can be solved to obtain a relation of the form

\displaystyle  P_x(t) \approx T_x \log t

for some real number {T_x} of polynomial size, and with further analysis of the relation (5) one can make {T_x} basically independent of {x}. This simplifies (3) to something like

\displaystyle  \int_0^X \sup_{P \in \mathrm{Poly}_{\leq k-1}({\bf R} \rightarrow {\bf R})} |\sum_{x \leq n \leq x+H} \lambda(n) n^{-iT}| \ dx = o(HX)

and this is now of a form that can be treated by the theorem of Matomäki and Radziwill (because {n \mapsto \lambda(n) n^{-iT}} is a bounded multiplicative function). (Actually because of the profinite term mentioned previously, one also has to insert a Dirichlet character of bounded conductor into this latter conclusion, but we will ignore this technicality.)

Now we apply the same strategy to (4). For abelian {G} the claim follows easily from (3), so we focus on the non-abelian case. One now has a polynomial sequence {g_x \in \mathrm{Poly}({\bf R} \rightarrow G)} attached to many {x \sim X}, and after a somewhat complicated adaptation of the above arguments one again ends up with an approximate functional equation

\displaystyle  g_x(a_x \cdot) \Gamma \approx g_x(b_x \cdot) \Gamma \ \ \ \ \ (6)

where the relation {\approx} is rather technical and will not be detailed here. A new difficulty arises in that there are some unwanted solutions to this equation, such as

\displaystyle  g_x(t) = \gamma^{\frac{\log(a_x t)}{\log(a_x/b_x)}}

for some {\gamma \in \Gamma}, which do not necessarily lead to multiplicative characters like {n^{-iT}} as in the polynomial case, but instead to some unfriendly looking “generalized multiplicative characters” (think of {e(\lfloor \alpha \log n \rfloor \beta \log n)} as a rough caricature). To avoid this problem, we rework the graph theory portion of the argument to produce not just one functional equation of the form (6)for each {x}, but many, leading to dilation invariances

\displaystyle  g_x((1+\theta) t) \Gamma \approx g_x(t) \Gamma

for a “dense” set of {\theta}. From a certain amount of Lie algebra theory (ultimately arising from an understanding of the behaviour of the exponential map on nilpotent matrices, and exploiting the hypothesis that {G} is non-abelian) one can conclude that (after some initial preparations to avoid degenerate cases) {g_x(t)} must behave like {\gamma_x^{\log t}} for some central element {\gamma_x} of {G}. This eventually brings one back to the multiplicative characters {n^{-iT}} that arose in the polynomial case, and the arguments now proceed as before.

We give two applications of this higher order Fourier uniformity. One regards the growth of the number

\displaystyle  s(k) := |\{ (\lambda(n+1),\dots,\lambda(n+k)): n \in {\bf N} \}|

of length {k} sign patterns in the Liouville function. The Chowla conjecture implies that {s(k) = 2^k}, but even the weaker conjecture of Sarnak that {s(k) \gg (1+\varepsilon)^k} for some {\varepsilon>0} remains open. Until recently, the best asymptotic lower bound on {s(k)} was {s(k) \gg k^2}, due to McNamara; with our result, we can now show {s(k) \gg_A k^A} for any {A} (in fact we can get {s(k) \gg_\varepsilon \exp(\log^{8/5-\varepsilon} k)} for any {\varepsilon>0}). The idea is to repeat the now-standard argument to exploit multiplicativity at small primes to deduce Chowla-type conjectures from Fourier uniformity conjectures, noting that the Chowla conjecture would give all the sign patterns one could hope for. The usual argument here uses the “entropy decrement argument” to eliminate a certain error term (involving the large but mean zero factor {p 1_{p|n}-1}). However the observation is that if there are extremely few sign patterns of length {k}, then the entropy decrement argument is unnecessary (there isn’t much entropy to begin with), and a more low-tech moment method argument (similar to the derivation of Chowla’s conjecture from Sarnak’s conjecture, as discussed for instance in this post) gives enough of Chowla’s conjecture to produce plenty of length {k} sign patterns. If there are not extremely few sign patterns of length {k} then we are done anyway. One quirk of this argument is that the sign patterns it produces may only appear exactly once; in contrast with preceding arguments, we were not able to produce a large number of sign patterns that each occur infinitely often.

The second application is to obtain cancellation for various polynomial averages involving the Liouville function {\lambda} or von Mangoldt function {\Lambda}, such as

\displaystyle  {\bf E}_{n \leq X} {\bf E}_{m \leq X^{1/d}} \lambda(n+P_1(m)) \lambda(n+P_2(m)) \dots \lambda(n+P_k(m))

or

\displaystyle  {\bf E}_{n \leq X} {\bf E}_{m \leq X^{1/d}} \lambda(n+P_1(m)) \Lambda(n+P_2(m)) \dots \Lambda(n+P_k(m))

where {P_1,\dots,P_k} are polynomials of degree at most {d}, no two of which differ by a constant (the latter is essential to avoid having to establish the Chowla or Hardy-Littlewood conjectures, which of course remain open). Results of this type were previously obtained by Tamar Ziegler and myself in the “true complexity zero” case when the polynomials {P} had distinct degrees, in which one could use the {k=0} theory of Matomäki and Radziwill; now that higher {k} is available at the scale {H=X^{1/d}} we can now remove this restriction.

In the modern theory of additive combinatorics, a large role is played by the Gowers uniformity norms {\|f\|_{U^k(G)}}, where {k \geq 1}, {G = (G,+)} is a finite abelian group, and {f: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} is a function (one can also consider these norms in finite approximate groups such as {[N] = \{1,\dots,N\}} instead of finite groups, but we will focus on the group case here for simplicity). These norms can be defined by the formula

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^k(G)} := (\mathop{\bf E}_{x,h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} \Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_k} f(x))^{1/2^k}

where we use the averaging notation

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{x \in A} f(x) := \frac{1}{|A|} \sum_{x \in A} f(x)

for any non-empty finite set {A} (with {|A|} denoting the cardinality of {A}), and {\Delta_h} is the multiplicative discrete derivative operator

\displaystyle \Delta_h f(x) := f(x+h) \overline{f(x)}.

One reason why these norms play an important role is that they control various multilinear averages. We give two sample examples here:

Proposition 1 Let {G = {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}}.

  • (i) If {a_1,\dots,a_k} are distinct elements of {G} for some {k \geq 2}, and {f_1,\dots,f_k: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} are {1}-bounded functions (thus {|f_j(x)| \leq 1} for all {j=1,\dots,k} and {x \in G}), then

    \displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{x, h \in G} f_1(x+a_1 h) \dots f_k(x+a_k h) \leq \|f_i\|_{U^{k-1}(G)} \ \ \ \ \ (1)

     

    for any {i=1,\dots,k}.

  • (ii) If {f_1,f_2,f_3: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} are {1}-bounded, then one has

    \displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{x, h \in G} f_1(x) f_2(x+h) f_3(x+h^2) \ll \|f_3\|_{U^4(G)} + N^{-1/4}.

We establish these claims a little later in this post.

In some more recent literature (e.g., this paper of Conlon, Fox, and Zhao), the role of Gowers norms have been replaced by (generalisations) of the cut norm, a concept originating from graph theory. In this blog post, it will be convenient to define these cut norms in the language of probability theory (using boldface to denote random variables).

Definition 2 (Cut norm) Let {{\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k, {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l} be independent random variables with {k,l \geq 0}; to avoid minor technicalities we assume that these random variables are discrete and take values in a finite set. Given a random variable {{\bf F} = F( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} of these independent random variables, we define the cut norm

\displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} := \sup | \mathop{\bf E} {\bf F} {\bf B}_1 \dots {\bf B}_k |

where the supremum ranges over all choices {{\bf B}_1,\dots,{\bf B}_k} of random variables {{\bf B}_i = B_i( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} that are {1}-bounded (thus {|{\bf B}_i| \leq 1} surely), and such that {{\bf B}_i} does not depend on {{\bf X}_i}.

If {l=0}, we abbreviate {\| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}} as {\| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k )}}.

Strictly speaking, the cut norm is only a cut semi-norm when {k=0,1}, but we will abuse notation by referring to it as a norm nevertheless.

Example 3 If {G = (V_1,V_2,E)} is a bipartite graph, and {\mathbf{v_1}}, {\mathbf{v_2}} are independent random variables chosen uniformly from {V_1,V_2} respectively, then

\displaystyle \| 1_E(\mathbf{v_1},\mathbf{v_2}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{v_1}, \mathbf{v_2})}

\displaystyle = \sup_{\|f\|_\infty, \|g\|_\infty \leq 1} |\mathop{\bf E}_{v_1 \in V_1, v_2 \in V_2} 1_E(v_1,v_2) f(v_1) g(v_2)|

where the supremum ranges over all {1}-bounded functions {f: V_1 \rightarrow [-1,1]}, {g: V_2 \rightarrow [-1,1]}. The right hand side is essentially the cut norm of the graph {G}, as defined for instance by Frieze and Kannan.

The cut norm is basically an expectation when {k=0,1}:

Example 4 If {k=0}, we see from definition that

\displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( ; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} =| \mathop{\bf E} {\bf F} |.

If {k=1}, one easily checks that

\displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} = \mathop{\bf E} | \mathop{\bf E}_{\bf X} {\bf F} |,

where {\mathop{\bf E}_{\bf X} {\bf F} = \mathop{\bf E}( {\bf F} | {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} is the conditional expectation of {{\bf F}} to the {\sigma}-algebra generated by all the variables other than {{\bf X}}, i.e., the {\sigma}-algebra generated by {{\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}. In particular, if {{\bf X}, {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l} are independent random variables drawn uniformly from {X,Y_1,\dots,Y_l} respectively, then

\displaystyle \| F( {\bf X}; {\bf Y}_1,\dots, {\bf Y}_l) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}

\displaystyle = \mathop{\bf E}_{y_1 \in Y_1,\dots, y_l \in Y_l} |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in X} F(x; y_1,\dots,y_l)|.

Here are some basic properties of the cut norm:

Lemma 5 (Basic properties of cut norm) Let {{\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l} be independent discrete random variables, and {{\bf F} = F({\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l)} a function of these variables.

  • (i) (Permutation invariance) The cut norm {\| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}} is invariant with respect to permutations of the {{\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k}, or permutations of the {{\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}.
  • (ii) (Conditioning) One has

    \displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} = \mathop{\bf E} \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k )}

    where on the right-hand side we view, for each realisation {y_1,\dots,y_l} of {{\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}, {{\bf F}} as a function {F( {\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k; y_1,\dots,y_l)} of the random variables {{\bf X}_1,\dots, {\bf X}_k} alone, thus the right-hand side may be expanded as

    \displaystyle \sum_{y_1,\dots,y_l} \| F( {\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k; y_1,\dots,y_l) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k )}

    \displaystyle \times \mathop{\bf P}( Y_1=y_1,\dots,Y_l=y_l).

  • (iii) (Monotonicity) If {k \geq 1}, we have

    \displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} \geq \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_{k-1}; {\bf X}_k, {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}.

  • (iv) (Multiplicative invariances) If {{\bf B} = B({\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l)} is a {1}-bounded function that does not depend on one of the {{\bf X}_i}, then

    \displaystyle \| {\bf B} {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} \leq \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}.

    In particular, if we additionally assume {|{\bf B}|=1}, then

    \displaystyle \| {\bf B} {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} = \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}.

  • (v) (Cauchy-Schwarz) If {k \geq 1}, one has

    \displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} \leq \| \Box_{{\bf X}_1, {\bf X}'_1} {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_2, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf X}_1, {\bf X}'_1, {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}^{1/2}

    where {{\bf X}'_1} is a copy of {{\bf X}_1} that is independent of {{\bf X}_1,\dots,{\bf X}_k,{\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l} and {\Box_{{\bf X}_1, {\bf X}'_1} {\bf F}} is the random variable

    \displaystyle \Box_{{\bf X}_1, {\bf X}'_1} {\bf F} := F( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )

    \displaystyle \times \overline{F}( {\bf X}'_1, {\bf X}_2, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l ).

  • (vi) (Averaging) If {k \geq 1} and {{\bf F} = \mathop{\bf E}_{\bf Z} {\bf F}_{\bf Z}}, where {{\bf Z}} is another random variable independent of {{\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}, and {{\bf F}_{\bf Z} = F_{\bf Z}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} is a random variable depending on both {{\bf Z}} and {{\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}, then

    \displaystyle \| {\bf F} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )} \leq \| {\bf F}_{\bf Z} \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( ({\bf X}_1, {\bf Z}), {\bf X}_2, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l )}

Proof: The claims (i), (ii) are clear from expanding out all the definitions. The claim (iii) also easily follows from the definitions (the left-hand side involves a supremum over a more general class of multipliers {{\bf B}_1,\dots,{\bf B}_{k}}, while the right-hand side omits the {{\bf B}_k} multiplier), as does (iv) (the multiplier {{\bf B}} can be absorbed into one of the multipliers in the definition of the cut norm). The claim (vi) follows by expanding out the definitions, and observing that all of the terms in the supremum appearing in the left-hand side also appear as terms in the supremum on the right-hand side. It remains to prove (v). By definition, the left-hand side is the supremum over all quantities of the form

\displaystyle |{\bf E} {\bf F} {\bf B}_1 \dots {\bf B}_k|

where the {{\bf B}_i} are {1}-bounded functions of {{\bf X}_1, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l} that do not depend on {{\bf X}_i}. We average out in the {{\bf X}_1} direction (that is, we condition out the variables {{\bf X}_2, \dots, {\bf X}_k; {\bf Y}_1,\dots,{\bf Y}_l}), and pull out the factor {{\bf B}_1} (which does not depend on {{\bf X}_1}), to write this as

\displaystyle |{\bf E} {\bf B}_1 {\bf E}_{{\bf X}_1}( {\bf F} {\bf B}_2 \dots {\bf B}_k )|,

which by Cauchy-Schwarz is bounded by

\displaystyle ( |{\bf E} |{\bf E}_{{\bf X}_1}( {\bf F} {\bf B}_2 \dots {\bf B}_k )|^2)^{1/2},

which can be expanded using the copy {{\bf X}_1} as

\displaystyle |{\bf E} \Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} ({\bf F} {\bf B}_2 \dots {\bf B}_k) |^{1/2}.

Expanding

\displaystyle \Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} ({\bf F} {\bf B}_2 \dots {\bf B}_k) = (\Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} {\bf F}) (\Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} {\bf B}_2) \dots (\Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} {\bf B}_k)

and noting that each {\Box_{{\bf X}_1,{\bf X}'_1} {\bf B}_i} is {1}-bounded and independent of {{\bf X}_i} for {i=2,\dots,k}, we obtain the claim. \Box

Now we can relate the cut norm to Gowers uniformity norms:

Lemma 6 Let {G} be a finite abelian group, let {{\bf x}, {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k} be independent random variables uniformly drawn from {G} for some {k \geq 0}, and let {f: G \rightarrow {\bf C}}. Then

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k, {\bf x} )} \leq \|f\|_{U^{k+1}(G)} \ \ \ \ \ (2)

and similarly (if {k \geq 1})

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k; {\bf x} )} \leq \|f\|_{U^{k}(G)} \ \ \ \ \ (3)

If {f} is additionally assumed to be {1}-bounded, we have the converse inequalities

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^{k+1}(G)}^{2^{k+1}} \leq \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k, {\bf x} )} \ \ \ \ \ (4)

and (if {k \geq 1})

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^{k}(G)}^{2^{k}} \leq \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k; {\bf x} )}. \ \ \ \ \ (5)

 

Proof: Applying Lemma 5(v) {k} times, we can bound

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h_1},\dots,{\bf h_k}, {\bf x} )}

by

\displaystyle \| \Box_{{\bf h}_k,{\bf h}'_k} \dots \Box_{{\bf h}_1,{\bf h}'_1} (f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k)) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf x}; {\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1, \dots, {\bf h}_k, {\bf h}'_k )}^{1/2^k} \ \ \ \ \ (6)

where {{\bf h}'_1,\dots,{\bf h}'_k} are independent copies of {{\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k} that are also independent of {{\bf x}}. The expression inside the norm can also be written as

\displaystyle \Delta_{{\bf h}_k - {\bf h}'_k} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_1 - {\bf h}'_1} f({\bf x} + {\bf h}'_1 + \dots + {\bf h}'_k)

so by Example 4 one can write (6) as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k,h'_1,\dots,h'_k \in G} |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k - h'_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1 - h'_1} f(x+h'_1+\dots+h'_k)||^{1/2^k}

which after some change of variables simplifies to

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)||^{1/2^k}

which by Cauchy-Schwarz is bounded by

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)|^2|^{1/2^{k+1}}

which one can rearrange as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k,h_{k+1},x \in G} \Delta_{h_{k+1}} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)|^{1/2^{k+1}}

giving (2). A similar argument bounds

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h_1},\dots,{\bf h_k}; {\bf x} )}

by

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} \mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)|^{1/2^k}

which gives (3).

For (4), we can reverse the above steps and expand {\|f\|_{U^{k+1}(G)}^{2^{k+1}}} as

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)|^2

which we can write as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k \in G} b(h_1,\dots,h_k) \mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} \Delta_{h_k} \dots \Delta_{h_1} f(x)|

for some {1}-bounded function {b}. This can in turn be expanded as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_k,x \in G} f(x+h_1+\dots+h_k) b(h_1,\dots,h_k) \prod_{i=1}^k b_i(x,h_1,\dots,h_k)|

for some {1}-bounded functions {b_i} that do not depend on {h_i}. By Example 4, this can be written as

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h_1}+\dots+{\bf h}_k) b({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k) \prod_{i=1}^k b_i(x,h_1,\dots,h_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(; {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k, {\bf x})}

which by several applications of Theorem 5(iii) and then Theorem 5(iv) can be bounded by

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h_1}+\dots+{\bf h}_k) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}( {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k, {\bf x})},

giving (4). A similar argument gives (5). \Box

Now we can prove Proposition 1. We begin with part (i). By permutation we may assume {i=k}, then by translation we may assume {a_k=0}. Replacing {x} by {x+h_1+\dots+h_{k-1}} and {h} by {h - a_1^{-1} h_1 - \dots - a_{k-1}^{-1} h_{k-1}}, we can write the left-hand side of (1) as

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{x,h,h_1,\dots,h_{k-1} \in G} f_k(x+h_1+\dots+h_{k-1}) \prod_{i=1}^{k-1} b_i(x,h,h_1,\dots,h_{k-1})

where

\displaystyle b_i(x,h,h_1,\dots,h_{k-1})

\displaystyle := f_i( x + h_1+\dots+h_{k-1}+ a_i(h - a_1^{-1} h_1 - \dots - a_k^{-1} h_{k-1}))

is a {1}-bounded function that does not depend on {h_i}. Taking {{\bf x}, {\bf h}, {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_k} to be independent random variables drawn uniformly from {G}, the left-hand side of (1) can then be written as

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E} f_k({\bf x}+{\bf h}_1+\dots+{\bf h}_{k-1}) \prod_{i=1}^{k-1} b_i({\bf x},{\bf h},{\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-1})

which by Example 4 is bounded in magnitude by

\displaystyle \| f_k({\bf x}+{\bf h}_1+\dots+{\bf h}_{k-1}) \prod_{i=1}^{k-1} b_i({\bf x},{\bf h},{\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-1}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(; {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-1}, {\bf x}, {\bf h})}.

After many applications of Lemma 5(iii), (iv), this is bounded by

\displaystyle \| f_k({\bf x}+{\bf h_1}+\dots+{\bf h_{k-1}}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-1}; {\bf x}, {\bf h})}

By Lemma 5(ii) we may drop the {{\bf h}} variable, and then the claim follows from Lemma 6.

For part (ii), we replace {x} by {x+a-h^2} and {h} by {h-a+b} to write the left-hand side as

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{x, a,b,h \in G} f_1(x+a-h^2) f_2(x+h+b-h^2) f_3(x+a+(h-a+b)^2-h^2);

the point here is that the first factor does not involve {b}, the second factor does not involve {a}, and the third factor has no quadratic terms in {h}. Letting {{\bf x}, {\bf a}, {\bf b}, {\bf h}} be independent variables drawn uniformly from {G}, we can use Example 4 to bound this in magnitude by

\displaystyle \| f_1({\bf x}+{\bf a}-{\bf h}^2) f_2({\bf x}+{\bf h}+{\bf b}-{\bf h}^2)

\displaystyle f_3( {\bf x}+{\bf a}+({\bf h}-{\bf a}+{\bf b})^2-{\bf h}^2 ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(; {\bf x}, {\bf a}, {\bf b}, {\bf h})}

which by Lemma 5(i),(iii),(iv) is bounded by

\displaystyle \| f_3( {\bf x}+{\bf a}+({\bf h}-{\bf a}+{\bf b})^2 - {\bf h}^2 ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf a}, {\bf b}; {\bf x}, {\bf h})}

and then by Lemma 5(v) we may bound this by

\displaystyle \| \Box_{{\bf a}, {\bf a}'} \Box_{{\bf b}, {\bf b}'} f_3( {\bf x}+{\bf a}+({\bf h}-{\bf a}+{\bf b})^2 - {\bf h}^2 ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(;{\bf a}, {\bf a}', {\bf b}, {\bf b}', {\bf x}, {\bf h})}^{1/4}

which by Example 4 is

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E} \Box_{{\bf a}, {\bf a}'} \Box_{{\bf b}, {\bf b}'} f_3( {\bf x}+{\bf a}+({\bf h}-{\bf a}+{\bf b})^2 - {\bf h}^2 )|^{1/4}

Now the expression inside the expectation is the product of four factors, each of which is {f_3} or {\overline{f}_3} applied to an affine form {{\bf x} + {\bf c} + {\bf a} {\bf h}} where {{\bf c}} depends on {{\bf a}, {\bf a}', {\bf b}, {\bf b}'} and {{\bf a}} is one of {2({\bf b}-{\bf a})}, {2({\bf b}'-{\bf a})}, {2({\bf b}-{\bf a}')}, {2({\bf b}'-{\bf a}')}. With probability {1-O(1/N)}, the four different values of {{\bf a}} are distinct, and then by part (i) we have

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}(\Box_{{\bf a}, {\bf a}'} \Box_{{\bf b}, {\bf b}'} f_3( {\bf x}+{\bf a}+({\bf h}-{\bf a}+{\bf b})^2 - {\bf h}^2 )|{\bf a}, {\bf a}', {\bf b}, {\bf b}')| \leq \|f_3\|_{U^4({\bf Z}/N{\bf Z})}.

When they are not distinct, we can instead bound this quantity by {1}. Taking expectations in {{\bf a}, {\bf a}', {\bf b}, {\bf b}'}, we obtain the claim. \Box

The analogue of the inverse {U^2} theorem for cut norms is the following claim (which I learned from Ben Green):

Lemma 7 ({U^2}-type inverse theorem) Let {\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{h}} be independent random variables drawn from a finite abelian group {G}, and let {f: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} be {1}-bounded. Then we have

\displaystyle \| f(\mathbf{x} + \mathbf{h}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{h})} = \sup_{\xi \in\hat G} \| f(\mathbf{x}) e(\xi \cdot \mathbf{x}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x})}

where {\hat G} is the group of homomorphisms {\xi: x \mapsto \xi \cdot x} is a homomorphism from {G} to {{\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, and {e(\theta) := e^{2\pi i \theta}}.

Proof: Suppose first that {\| f(\mathbf{x} + \mathbf{h}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{h})} > \delta} for some {\delta}, then by definition

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x,h \in G} f(x+h) a(x) b(h)| > \delta

for some {1}-bounded {a,b: G \rightarrow {\bf C}}. By Fourier expansion, the left-hand side is also

\displaystyle \sum_{\xi \in \hat G} \hat f(-\xi) \hat a(\xi) \hat b(\xi)

where {\hat f(\xi) := \mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f(x) e(-\xi \cdot x)}. From Plancherel’s theorem we have

\displaystyle \sum_{\xi \in \hat G} |\hat a(\xi)|^2, \sum_{\xi \in \hat G} |\hat b(\xi)|^2 \leq 1

hence by Hölder’s inequality one has {|\hat f(-\xi)| > \delta} for some {\xi \in \hat G}, and hence

\displaystyle \sup_{\xi \in\hat G} \| f(\mathbf{x}) e(\xi \cdot \mathbf{x}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x})} > \delta. \ \ \ \ \ (7)

Conversely, suppose (7) holds. Then there is {\xi \in \hat G} such that

\displaystyle \| f(\mathbf{x}) e(\xi \cdot \mathbf{x}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x})} > \delta

which on substitution and Example 4 implies

\displaystyle \| f(\mathbf{x}+\mathbf{h}) e(\xi \cdot (\mathbf{x}+\mathbf{h})) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(;\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{h})} > \delta.

The term {e(\xi \cdot (\mathbf{x}+\mathbf{h}))} splits into the product of a factor {e(\xi \cdot \mathbf{x})} not depending on {\mathbf{h}}, and a factor {e(\xi \cdot \mathbf{h})} not depending on {\mathbf{x}}. Applying Lemma 5(iii), (iv) we conclude that

\displaystyle \| f(\mathbf{x}+\mathbf{h}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(\mathbf{x}, \mathbf{h})} > \delta.

The claim follows. \Box

The higher order inverse theorems are much less trivial (and the optimal quantitative bounds are not currently known). However, there is a useful degree lowering argument, due to Peluse and Prendiville, that can allow one to lower the order of a uniformity norm in some cases. We give a simple version of this argument here:

Lemma 8 (Degree lowering argument, special case) Let {G} be a finite abelian group, let {Y} be a non-empty finite set, and let {f: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} be a function of the form {f(x) := \mathop{\bf E}_{y \in Y} F_y(x)} for some {1}-bounded functions {F_y: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} indexed by {y \in Y}. Suppose that

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^k(G)} \geq \delta

for some {k \geq 2} and {0 < \delta \leq 1}. Then one of the following claims hold (with implied constants allowed to depend on {k}):

  • (i) (Degree lowering) one has {\|f\|_{U^{k-1}(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)}}.
  • (ii) (Non-zero frequency) There exist {h_1,\dots,h_{k-2} \in G} and non-zero {\xi \in \hat G} such that

    \displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G, y \in Y} \Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} F_y(x) e( \xi \cdot x )| \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

There are more sophisticated versions of this argument in which the frequency {\xi} is “minor arc” rather than “zero frequency”, and then the Gowers norms are localised to suitable large arithmetic progressions; this is implicit in the above-mentioned paper of Peluse and Prendiville.

Proof: One can write

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^k(G)}^{2^k} = \mathop{\bf E}_{h_1,\dots,h_{k-2} \in G} \|\Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} f \|_{U^2(G)}^4

and hence we conclude that

\displaystyle \|\Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} f \|_{U^2(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)}

for a set {\Sigma} of tuples {(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \in G^{k-2}} of density {h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}}. Applying Lemma 6 and Lemma 7, we see that for each such tuple, there exists {\phi(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \in \hat G} such that

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \phi(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}, \ \ \ \ \ (8)

where {{\bf x}} is drawn uniformly from {G}.

Let us adopt the convention that {e( \phi( _1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) } vanishes for {(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2})} not in {\Sigma}, then from Lemma 5(ii) we have

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{{\bf h}_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}; {\bf h}_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)},

where {{\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}} are independent random variables drawn uniformly from {G} and also independent of {{\bf x}}. By repeated application of Lemma 5(iii) we then have

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{{\bf h}_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x},{\bf h}_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

Expanding out {\Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} f({\bf x})} and using Lemma 5(iv) repeatedly we conclude that

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x},{\bf h}_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

From definition of {f} we then have

\displaystyle \| {\bf E}_{y \in Y} F_y({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x},{\bf h}_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2})}

\displaystyle \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

By Lemma 5(vi), we see that the left-hand side is less than

\displaystyle \| F_{\bf y}({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(({\bf x}, {\bf y}),{\bf h}_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2})},

where {{\bf y}} is drawn uniformly from {Y}, independently of {{\bf x}, {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}}. By repeated application of Lemma 5(i), (v) repeatedly, we conclude that

\displaystyle \| \Box_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \Box_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} (F_{\bf y}({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} )) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}(({\bf x},{\bf y}); {\bf h}_1,{\bf h}'_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)},

where {{\bf h}'_1,\dots,{\bf h}'_{k-2}} are independent copies of {{\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}} that are also independent of {{\bf x}}, {{\bf y}}. By Lemma 5(ii) and Example 4 we conclude that

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}( \Box_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \Box_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} (F_{\bf y}({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) e( \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} )) | {\bf h}_1,{\bf h}'_1,\dots, {\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}) )| \gg \delta^{O(1)} \ \ \ \ \ (9)

with probability {\gg \delta^{O(1)}}.

The left-hand side can be rewritten as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G, y \in Y} \Delta_{{\bf h}_1 - {\bf h}'_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2} - {\bf h}'_{k-2}} F_y( x + {\bf h}'_1 + \dots + {\bf h}'_{k-2})

\displaystyle e( \delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot x )|

where {\delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1}} is the additive version of {\Box_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1}}, thus

\displaystyle \delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) := \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) - \phi({\bf h}'_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}).

Translating {x}, we can simplify this a little to

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G, y \in Y} \Delta_{{\bf h}_1 - {\bf h}'_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_k - {\bf h}'_k} F_y( x ) e( \delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot x )|

If the frequency {\delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2})} is ever non-vanishing in the event (9) then conclusion (ii) applies. We conclude that

\displaystyle \delta_{{\bf h}_1, {\bf h}'_1} \dots \delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, {\bf h}'_{k-2}} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) = 0

with probability {\gg \delta^{O(1)}}. In particular, by the pigeonhole principle, there exist {h'_1,\dots,h'_{k-2} \in G} such that

\displaystyle \delta_{{\bf h}_1, h'_1} \dots \delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}, h'_{k-2}} \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) = 0

with probability {\gg \delta^{O(1)}}. Expanding this out, we obtain a representation of the form

\displaystyle \phi({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) = \sum_{i=1}^{k-2} \phi_i({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2})

holding with probability {\gg \delta^{O(1)}}, where the {\phi_i: G^{k-2} \rightarrow {\bf R}/{\bf Z}} are functions that do not depend on the {i^{th}} coordinate. From (8) we conclude that

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{h_1} \dots \Delta_{h_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \sum_{i=1}^{k-2} \phi_i(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}

for {\gg \delta^{O(1)}} of the tuples {(h_1,\dots,h_{k-2}) \in G^{k-2}}. Thus by Lemma 5(ii)

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{{\bf h}_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \sum_{i=1}^{k-2} \phi_i({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}; {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

By repeated application of Lemma 5(iii) we then have

\displaystyle \| \Delta_{{\bf h}_1} \dots \Delta_{{\bf h}_{k-2}} f({\bf x}) e( \sum_{i=1}^{k-2} \phi_i({\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2}) \cdot {\bf x} ) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}, {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}

and then by repeated application of Lemma 5(iv)

\displaystyle \| f({\bf x} + {\bf h}_1 + \dots + {\bf h}_{k-2}) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}, {\bf h}_1,\dots,{\bf h}_{k-2})} \gg \delta^{O(1)}

and then the conclusion (i) follows from Lemma 6. \Box

As an application of degree lowering, we give an inverse theorem for the average in Proposition 1(ii), first established by Bourgain-Chang and later reproved by Peluse (by different methods from those given here):

Proposition 9 Let {G = {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} be a cyclic group of prime order. Suppose that one has {1}-bounded functions {f_1,f_2,f_3: G \rightarrow {\bf C}} such that

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x, h \in G} f_1(x) f_2(x+h) f_3(x+h^2)| \geq \delta \ \ \ \ \ (10)

for some {\delta > 0}. Then either {N \ll \delta^{-O(1)}}, or one has

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f_1(x)|, |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f_2(x)| \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

We remark that a modification of the arguments below also give {|\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f_3(x)| \gg \delta^{O(1)}}.

Proof: The left-hand side of (10) can be written as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} F(x) f_3(x)|

where {F} is the dual function

\displaystyle F(x) := \mathop{\bf E}_{h \in G} f_1(x-h^2) f_2(x-h^2+h).

By Cauchy-Schwarz one thus has

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} F(x) \overline{F}(x)| \geq \delta^2

and hence by Proposition 1, we either have {N \ll \delta^{-O(1)}} (in which case we are done) or

\displaystyle \|F\|_{U^4(G)} \gg \delta^2.

Writing {F = \mathop{\bf E}_{h \in G} F_h} with {F_h(x) := f_1(x-h^2) f_2(x-h^2+h)}, we conclude that either {\|F\|_{U^3(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)}}, or that

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x,h \in G} \Delta_{h_1} \Delta_{h_2} F_h(x) e(\xi x / N )| \gg \delta^{O(1)}

for some {h_1,h_2 \in G} and non-zero {\xi \in G}. The left-hand side can be rewritten as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x,h \in G} g_1(x-h^2) g_2(x-h^2+h) e(\xi x/N)|

where {g_1 = \Delta_{h_1} \Delta_{h_2} f_1} and {g_2 = \Delta_{h_1} \Delta_{h_2} f_2}. We can rewrite this in turn as

\displaystyle |\mathop{\bf E}_{x,y \in G} g_1(x) g_2(y) e(\xi (x + (y-x)^2) / N)|

which is bounded by

\displaystyle \| e(\xi({\bf x} + ({\bf y}-{\bf x})^2)/N) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}, {\bf y})}

where {{\bf x}, {\bf y}} are independent random variables drawn uniformly from {G}. Applying Lemma 5(v), we conclude that

\displaystyle \| \Box_{{\bf y}, {\bf y}'} e(\xi({\bf x} + ({\bf y}-{\bf x})^2)/N) \|_{\mathrm{CUT}({\bf x}; {\bf y}, {\bf y}')} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

However, a routine Gauss sum calculation reveals that the left-hand side is {O(N^{-c})} for some absolute constant {c>0} because {\xi} is non-zero, so that {N \ll \delta^{-O(1)}}. The only remaining case to consider is when

\displaystyle \|F\|_{U^3(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

Repeating the above arguments we then conclude that

\displaystyle \|F\|_{U^2(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)},

and then

\displaystyle \|F\|_{U^1(G)} \gg \delta^{O(1)}.

The left-hand side can be computed to equal {|\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f_1(x)| |\mathop{\bf E}_{x \in G} f_2(x)|}, and the claim follows. \Box

This argument was given for the cyclic group setting, but the argument can also be applied to the integers (see Peluse-Prendiville) and can also be used to establish an analogue over the reals (that was first obtained by Bourgain).

Tamar Ziegler and I have just uploaded to the arXiv two related papers: “Concatenation theorems for anti-Gowers-uniform functions and Host-Kra characteoristic factors” and “polynomial patterns in primes“, with the former developing a “quantitative Bessel inequality” for local Gowers norms that is crucial in the latter.

We use the term “concatenation theorem” to denote results in which structural control of a function in two or more “directions” can be “concatenated” into structural control in a joint direction. A trivial example of such a concatenation theorem is the following: if a function {f: {\bf Z} \times {\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf R}} is constant in the first variable (thus {x \mapsto f(x,y)} is constant for each {y}), and also constant in the second variable (thus {y \mapsto f(x,y)} is constant for each {x}), then it is constant in the joint variable {(x,y)}. A slightly less trivial example: if a function {f: {\bf Z} \times {\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf R}} is affine-linear in the first variable (thus, for each {y}, there exist {\alpha(y), \beta(y)} such that {f(x,y) = \alpha(y) x + \beta(y)} for all {x}) and affine-linear in the second variable (thus, for each {x}, there exist {\gamma(x), \delta(x)} such that {f(x,y) = \gamma(x)y + \delta(x)} for all {y}) then {f} is a quadratic polynomial in {x,y}; in fact it must take the form

\displaystyle f(x,y) = \epsilon xy + \zeta x + \eta y + \theta \ \ \ \ \ (1)

 

for some real numbers {\epsilon, \zeta, \eta, \theta}. (This can be seen for instance by using the affine linearity in {y} to show that the coefficients {\alpha(y), \beta(y)} are also affine linear.)

The same phenomenon extends to higher degree polynomials. Given a function {f: G \rightarrow K} from one additive group {G} to another, we say that {f} is of degree less than {d} along a subgroup {H} of {G} if all the {d}-fold iterated differences of {f} along directions in {H} vanish, that is to say

\displaystyle \partial_{h_1} \dots \partial_{h_d} f(x) = 0

for all {x \in G} and {h_1,\dots,h_d \in H}, where {\partial_h} is the difference operator

\displaystyle \partial_h f(x) := f(x+h) - f(x).

(We adopt the convention that the only {f} of degree less than {0} is the zero function.)

We then have the following simple proposition:

Proposition 1 (Concatenation of polynomiality) Let {f: G \rightarrow K} be of degree less than {d_1} along one subgroup {H_1} of {G}, and of degree less than {d_2} along another subgroup {H_2} of {G}, for some {d_1,d_2 \geq 1}. Then {f} is of degree less than {d_1+d_2-1} along the subgroup {H_1+H_2} of {G}.

Note the previous example was basically the case when {G = {\bf Z} \times {\bf Z}}, {H_1 = {\bf Z} \times \{0\}}, {H_2 = \{0\} \times {\bf Z}}, {K = {\bf R}}, and {d_1=d_2=2}.

Proof: The claim is trivial for {d_1=1} or {d_2=1} (in which {f} is constant along {H_1} or {H_2} respectively), so suppose inductively {d_1,d_2 \geq 2} and the claim has already been proven for smaller values of {d_1-1}.

We take a derivative in a direction {h_1 \in H_1} along {h_1} to obtain

\displaystyle T^{-h_1} f = f + \partial_{h_1} f

where {T^{-h_1} f(x) = f(x+h_1)} is the shift of {f} by {-h_1}. Then we take a further shift by a direction {h_2 \in H_2} to obtain

\displaystyle T^{-h_1-h_2} f = T^{-h_2} f + T^{-h_2} \partial_{h_1} f = f + \partial_{h_2} f + T^{-h_2} \partial_{h_1} f

leading to the cocycle equation

\displaystyle \partial_{h_1+h_2} f = \partial_{h_2} f + T^{-h_2} \partial_{h_1} f.

Since {f} has degree less than {d_1} along {H_1} and degree less than {d_2} along {H_2}, {\partial_{h_1} f} has degree less than {d_1-1} along {H_1} and less than {d_2} along {H_2}, so is degree less than {d_1+d_2-2} along {H_1+H_2} by induction hypothesis. Similarly {\partial_{h_2} f} is also of degree less than {d_1+d_2-2} along {H_1+H_2}. Combining this with the cocycle equation we see that {\partial_{h_1+h_2}f} is of degree less than {d_1+d_2-2} along {H_1+H_2} for any {h_1+h_2 \in H_1+H_2}, and hence {f} is of degree less than {d_1+d_2-1} along {H_1+H_2}, as required. \Box

While this proposition is simple, it already illustrates some basic principles regarding how one would go about proving a concatenation theorem:

  • (i) One should perform induction on the degrees {d_1,d_2} involved, and take advantage of the recursive nature of degree (in this case, the fact that a function is of less than degree {d} along some subgroup {H} of directions iff all of its first derivatives along {H} are of degree less than {d-1}).
  • (ii) Structure is preserved by operations such as addition, shifting, and taking derivatives. In particular, if a function {f} is of degree less than {d} along some subgroup {H}, then any derivative {\partial_k f} of {f} is also of degree less than {d} along {H}, even if {k} does not belong to {H}.

Here is another simple example of a concatenation theorem. Suppose an at most countable additive group {G} acts by measure-preserving shifts {T: g \mapsto T^g} on some probability space {(X, {\mathcal X}, \mu)}; we call the pair {(X,T)} (or more precisely {(X, {\mathcal X}, \mu, T)}) a {G}-system. We say that a function {f \in L^\infty(X)} is a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {d} along some subgroup {H} of {G} and some {d \geq 1} if one has

\displaystyle T^h f = \lambda_h f

almost everywhere for all {h \in H}, and some functions {\lambda_h \in L^\infty(X)} of degree less than {d-1} along {H}, with the convention that a function has degree less than {0} if and only if it is equal to {1}. Thus for instance, a function {f} is an generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {1} along {H} if it is constant on almost every {H}-ergodic component of {G}, and is a generalised function of degree less than {2} along {H} if it is an eigenfunction of the shift action on almost every {H}-ergodic component of {G}. A basic example of a higher order eigenfunction is the function {f(x,y) := e^{2\pi i y}} on the skew shift {({\bf R}/{\bf Z})^2} with {{\bf Z}} action given by the generator {T(x,y) := (x+\alpha,y+x)} for some irrational {\alpha}. One can check that {T^h f = \lambda_h f} for every integer {h}, where {\lambda_h: x \mapsto e^{2\pi i \binom{h}{2} \alpha} e^{2\pi i h x}} is a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {2} along {{\bf Z}}, so {f} is of degree less than {3} along {{\bf Z}}.

We then have

Proposition 2 (Concatenation of higher order eigenfunctions) Let {(X,T)} be a {G}-system, and let {f \in L^\infty(X)} be a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {d_1} along one subgroup {H_1} of {G}, and a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {d_2} along another subgroup {H_2} of {G}, for some {d_1,d_2 \geq 1}. Then {f} is a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {d_1+d_2-1} along the subgroup {H_1+H_2} of {G}.

The argument is almost identical to that of the previous proposition and is left as an exercise to the reader. The key point is the point (ii) identified earlier: the space of generalised eigenfunctions of degree less than {d} along {H} is preserved by multiplication and shifts, as well as the operation of “taking derivatives” {f \mapsto \lambda_k} even along directions {k} that do not lie in {H}. (To prove this latter claim, one should restrict to the region where {f} is non-zero, and then divide {T^k f} by {f} to locate {\lambda_k}.)

A typical example of this proposition in action is as follows: consider the {{\bf Z}^2}-system given by the {3}-torus {({\bf R}/{\bf Z})^3} with generating shifts

\displaystyle T^{(1,0)}(x,y,z) := (x+\alpha,y,z+y)

\displaystyle T^{(0,1)}(x,y,z) := (x,y+\alpha,z+x)

for some irrational {\alpha}, which can be checked to give a {{\bf Z}^2} action

\displaystyle T^{(n,m)}(x,y,z) := (x+n\alpha, y+m\alpha, z+ny+mx+nm\alpha).

The function {f(x,y,z) := e^{2\pi i z}} can then be checked to be a generalised eigenfunction of degree less than {2} along {{\bf Z} \times \{0\}}, and also less than {2} along {\{0\} \times {\bf Z}}, and less than {3} along {{\bf Z}^2}. One can view this example as the dynamical systems translation of the example (1) (see this previous post for some more discussion of this sort of correspondence).

The main results of our concatenation paper are analogues of these propositions concerning a more complicated notion of “polynomial-like” structure that are of importance in additive combinatorics and in ergodic theory. On the ergodic theory side, the notion of structure is captured by the Host-Kra characteristic factors {Z^{<d}_H(X)} of a {G}-system {X} along a subgroup {H}. These factors can be defined in a number of ways. One is by duality, using the Gowers-Host-Kra uniformity seminorms (defined for instance here) {\| \|_{U^d_H(X)}}. Namely, {Z^{<d}_H(X)} is the factor of {X} defined up to equivalence by the requirement that

\displaystyle \|f\|_{U^d_H(X)} = 0 \iff {\bf E}(f | Z^{<d}_H(X) ) = 0.

An equivalent definition is in terms of the dual functions {{\mathcal D}^d_H(f)} of {f} along {H}, which can be defined recursively by setting {{\mathcal D}^0_H(f) = 1} and

\displaystyle {\mathcal D}^d_H(f) = {\bf E}_h T^h f {\mathcal D}^{d-1}( f \overline{T^h f} )

where {{\bf E}_h} denotes the ergodic average along a Følner sequence in {G} (in fact one can also define these concepts in non-amenable abelian settings as per this previous post). The factor {Z^{<d}_H(X)} can then be alternately defined as the factor generated by the dual functions {{\mathcal D}^d_H(f)} for {f \in L^\infty(X)}.

In the case when {G=H={\bf Z}} and {X} is {G}-ergodic, a deep theorem of Host and Kra shows that the factor {Z^{<d}_H(X)} is equivalent to the inverse limit of nilsystems of step less than {d}. A similar statement holds with {{\bf Z}} replaced by any finitely generated group by Griesmer, while the case of an infinite vector space over a finite field was treated in this paper of Bergelson, Ziegler, and myself. The situation is more subtle when {X} is not {G}-ergodic, or when {X} is {G}-ergodic but {H} is a proper subgroup of {G} acting non-ergodically, when one has to start considering measurable families of directional nilsystems; see for instance this paper of Austin for some of the subtleties involved (for instance, higher order group cohomology begins to become relevant!).

One of our main theorems is then

Proposition 3 (Concatenation of characteristic factors) Let {(X,T)} be a {G}-system, and let {f} be measurable with respect to the factor {Z^{<d_1}_{H_1}(X)} and with respect to the factor {Z^{<d_2}_{H_2}(X)} for some {d_1,d_2 \geq 1} and some subgroups {H_1,H_2} of {G}. Then {f} is also measurable with respect to the factor {Z^{<d_1+d_2-1}_{H_1+H_2}(X)}.

We give two proofs of this proposition in the paper; an ergodic-theoretic proof using the Host-Kra theory of “cocycles of type {<d} (along a subgroup {H})”, which can be used to inductively describe the factors {Z^{<d}_H}, and a combinatorial proof based on a combinatorial analogue of this proposition which is harder to state (but which roughly speaking asserts that a function which is nearly orthogonal to all bounded functions of small {U^{d_1}_{H_1}} norm, and also to all bounded functions of small {U^{d_2}_{H_2}} norm, is also nearly orthogonal to alll bounded functions of small {U^{d_1+d_2-1}_{H_1+H_2}} norm). The combinatorial proof parallels the proof of Proposition 2. A key point is that dual functions {F := {\mathcal D}^d_H(f)} obey a property analogous to being a generalised eigenfunction, namely that

\displaystyle T^h F = {\bf E}_k \lambda_{h,k} F_k

where {F_k := T^k F} and {\lambda_{h,k} := {\mathcal D}^{d-1}( T^h f \overline{T^k f} )} is a “structured function of order {d-1}” along {H}. (In the language of this previous paper of mine, this is an assertion that dual functions are uniformly almost periodic of order {d}.) Again, the point (ii) above is crucial, and in particular it is key that any structure that {F} has is inherited by the associated functions {\lambda_{h,k}} and {F_k}. This sort of inheritance is quite easy to accomplish in the ergodic setting, as there is a ready-made language of factors to encapsulate the concept of structure, and the shift-invariance and {\sigma}-algebra properties of factors make it easy to show that just about any “natural” operation one performs on a function measurable with respect to a given factor, returns a function that is still measurable in that factor. In the finitary combinatorial setting, though, encoding the fact (ii) becomes a remarkably complicated notational nightmare, requiring a huge amount of “epsilon management” and “second-order epsilon management” (in which one manages not only scalar epsilons, but also function-valued epsilons that depend on other parameters). In order to avoid all this we were forced to utilise a nonstandard analysis framework for the combinatorial theorems, which made the arguments greatly resemble the ergodic arguments in many respects (though the two settings are still not equivalent, see this previous blog post for some comparisons between the two settings). Unfortunately the arguments are still rather complicated.

For combinatorial applications, dual formulations of the concatenation theorem are more useful. A direct dualisation of the theorem yields the following decomposition theorem: a bounded function which is small in {U^{d_1+d_2-1}_{H_1+H_2}} norm can be split into a component that is small in {U^{d_1}_{H_1}} norm, and a component that is small in {U^{d_2}_{H_2}} norm. (One may wish to understand this type of result by first proving the following baby version: any function that has mean zero on every coset of {H_1+H_2}, can be decomposed as the sum of a function that has mean zero on every {H_1} coset, and a function that has mean zero on every {H_2} coset. This is dual to the assertion that a function that is constant on every {H_1} coset and constant on every {H_2} coset, is constant on every {H_1+H_2} coset.) Combining this with some standard “almost orthogonality” arguments (i.e. Cauchy-Schwarz) give the following Bessel-type inequality: if one has a lot of subgroups {H_1,\dots,H_k} and a bounded function is small in {U^{2d-1}_{H_i+H_j}} norm for most {i,j}, then it is also small in {U^d_{H_i}} norm for most {i}. (Here is a baby version one may wish to warm up on: if a function {f} has small mean on {({\bf Z}/p{\bf Z})^2} for some large prime {p}, then it has small mean on most of the cosets of most of the one-dimensional subgroups of {({\bf Z}/p{\bf Z})^2}.)

There is also a generalisation of the above Bessel inequality (as well as several of the other results mentioned above) in which the subgroups {H_i} are replaced by more general coset progressions {H_i+P_i} (of bounded rank), so that one has a Bessel inequailty controlling “local” Gowers uniformity norms such as {U^d_{P_i}} by “global” Gowers uniformity norms such as {U^{2d-1}_{P_i+P_j}}. This turns out to be particularly useful when attempting to compute polynomial averages such as

\displaystyle \sum_{n \leq N} \sum_{r \leq \sqrt{N}} f(n) g(n+r^2) h(n+2r^2) \ \ \ \ \ (2)

 

for various functions {f,g,h}. After repeated use of the van der Corput lemma, one can control such averages by expressions such as

\displaystyle \sum_{n \leq N} \sum_{h,m,k \leq \sqrt{N}} f(n) f(n+mh) f(n+mk) f(n+m(h+k))

(actually one ends up with more complicated expressions than this, but let’s use this example for sake of discussion). This can be viewed as an average of various {U^2} Gowers uniformity norms of {f} along arithmetic progressions of the form {\{ mh: h \leq \sqrt{N}\}} for various {m \leq \sqrt{N}}. Using the above Bessel inequality, this can be controlled in turn by an average of various {U^3} Gowers uniformity norms along rank two generalised arithmetic progressions of the form {\{ m_1 h_1 + m_2 h_2: h_1,h_2 \le \sqrt{N}\}} for various {m_1,m_2 \leq \sqrt{N}}. But for generic {m_1,m_2}, this rank two progression is close in a certain technical sense to the “global” interval {\{ n: n \leq N \}} (this is ultimately due to the basic fact that two randomly chosen large integers are likely to be coprime, or at least have a small gcd). As a consequence, one can use the concatenation theorems from our first paper to control expressions such as (2) in terms of global Gowers uniformity norms. This is important in number theoretic applications, when one is interested in computing sums such as

\displaystyle \sum_{n \leq N} \sum_{r \leq \sqrt{N}} \mu(n) \mu(n+r^2) \mu(n+2r^2)

or

\displaystyle \sum_{n \leq N} \sum_{r \leq \sqrt{N}} \Lambda(n) \Lambda(n+r^2) \Lambda(n+2r^2)

where {\mu} and {\Lambda} are the Möbius and von Mangoldt functions respectively. This is because we are able to control global Gowers uniformity norms of such functions (thanks to results such as the proof of the inverse conjecture for the Gowers norms, the orthogonality of the Möbius function with nilsequences, and asymptotics for linear equations in primes), but much less control is currently available for local Gowers uniformity norms, even with the assistance of the generalised Riemann hypothesis (see this previous blog post for some further discussion).

By combining these tools and strategies with the “transference principle” approach from our previous paper (as improved using the recent “densification” technique of Conlon, Fox, and Zhao, discussed in this previous post), we are able in particular to establish the following result:

Theorem 4 (Polynomial patterns in the primes) Let {P_1,\dots,P_k: {\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf Z}} be polynomials of degree at most {d}, whose degree {d} coefficients are all distinct, for some {d \geq 1}. Suppose that {P_1,\dots,P_k} is admissible in the sense that for every prime {p}, there are {n,r} such that {n+P_1(r),\dots,n+P_k(r)} are all coprime to {p}. Then there exist infinitely many pairs {n,r} of natural numbers such that {n+P_1(r),\dots,n+P_k(r)} are prime.

Furthermore, we obtain an asymptotic for the number of such pairs {n,r} in the range {n \leq N}, {r \leq N^{1/d}} (actually for minor technical reasons we reduce the range of {r} to be very slightly less than {N^{1/d}}). In fact one could in principle obtain asymptotics for smaller values of {r}, and relax the requirement that the degree {d} coefficients be distinct with the requirement that no two of the {P_i} differ by a constant, provided one had good enough local uniformity results for the Möbius or von Mangoldt functions. For instance, we can obtain an asymptotic for triplets of the form {n, n+r,n+r^d} unconditionally for {d \leq 5}, and conditionally on GRH for all {d}, using known results on primes in short intervals on average.

The {d=1} case of this theorem was obtained in a previous paper of myself and Ben Green (using the aforementioned conjectures on the Gowers uniformity norm and the orthogonality of the Möbius function with nilsequences, both of which are now proven). For higher {d}, an older result of Tamar and myself was able to tackle the case when {P_1(0)=\dots=P_k(0)=0} (though our results there only give lower bounds on the number of pairs {(n,r)}, and no asymptotics). Both of these results generalise my older theorem with Ben Green on the primes containing arbitrarily long arithmetic progressions. The theorem also extends to multidimensional polynomials, in which case there are some additional previous results; see the paper for more details. We also get a technical refinement of our previous result on narrow polynomial progressions in (dense subsets of) the primes by making the progressions just a little bit narrower in the case of the density of the set one is using is small.

 

This week I have been at a Banff workshop “Combinatorics meets Ergodic theory“, focused on the combinatorics surrounding Szemerédi’s theorem and the Gowers uniformity norms on one hand, and the ergodic theory surrounding Furstenberg’s multiple recurrence theorem and the Host-Kra structure theory on the other. This was quite a fruitful workshop, and directly inspired the various posts this week on this blog. Incidentally, BIRS being as efficient as it is, videos for this week’s talks are already online.

As mentioned in the previous two posts, Ben Green, Tamar Ziegler, and myself proved the following inverse theorem for the Gowers norms:

Theorem 1 (Inverse theorem for Gowers norms) Let {N \geq 1} and {s \geq 1} be integers, and let {\delta > 0}. Suppose that {f: {\bf Z} \rightarrow [-1,1]} is a function supported on {[N] := \{1,\dots,N\}} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{s+2}} \sum_{n,h_1,\dots,h_{s+1} \in {\bf Z}} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(n+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}) \geq \delta.

Then there exists a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta}(1)}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta}(1)} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N} \sum_n f(n) F(g(n) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta} 1.

There is a higher dimensional generalisation, which first appeared explicitly (in a more general form) in this preprint of Szegedy (which used a slightly different argument than the one of Ben, Tammy, and myself; see also this previous preprint of Szegedy with related results):

Theorem 2 (Inverse theorem for multidimensional Gowers norms) Let {N \geq 1} and {s,d \geq 1} be integers, and let {\delta > 0}. Suppose that {f: {\bf Z}^d \rightarrow [-1,1]} is a function supported on {[N]^d} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{d(s+2)}} \sum_{n,h_1,\dots,h_{s+1} \in {\bf Z}^d} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(n+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}) \geq \delta. \ \ \ \ \ (1)

Then there exists a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta,d}(1)}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z}^d \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta,d}(1)} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^d} \sum_{n \in {\bf Z}^d} f(n) F(g(n) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta,d} 1.

The {d=2} case of this theorem was recently used by Wenbo Sun. One can replace the polynomial sequence with a linear sequence if desired by using a lifting trick (essentially due to Furstenberg, but which appears explicitly in Appendix C of my paper with Ben and Tammy).

In this post I would like to record a very neat and simple observation of Ben Green and Nikos Frantzikinakis, that uses the tool of Freiman isomorphisms to derive Theorem 2 as a corollary of the one-dimensional theorem. Namely, consider the linear map {\phi: {\bf Z}^d \rightarrow {\bf Z}} defined by

\displaystyle \phi( n_1,\dots,n_d ) := \sum_{i=1}^d (10 N)^{i-1} n_i,

that is to say {\phi} is the digit string base {10N} that has digits {n_d \dots n_1}. This map is a linear map from {[N]^d} to a subset of {[d 10^d N^d]} of density {1/(d10^d)}. Furthermore it has the following “Freiman isomorphism” property: if {n, h_1,\dots,h_{s+1}} lie in {{\bf Z}} with {n + \omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}} in the image set {\phi( [N]^d )} of {[N]^d} for all {\omega}, then there exist (unique) lifts {\tilde n \in {\bf Z}^d, \tilde h_1,\dots,\tilde h_{s+1} \in {\bf Z}} such that

\displaystyle \tilde n + \omega_1 \tilde h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} \tilde h_{s+1} \in [N]^d

and

\displaystyle \phi( \tilde n + \omega_1 \tilde h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} \tilde h_{s+1} ) = n + \omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}

for all {\omega}. Indeed, the injectivity of {\phi} on {[N]^d} uniquely determines the sum {\tilde n + \omega_1 \tilde h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} \tilde h_{s+1}} for each {\omega}, and one can use base {10N} arithmetic to verify that the alternating sum of these sums on any {2}-facet of the cube {\{0,1\}^{s+1}} vanishes, which gives the claim. (In the language of additive combinatorics, the point is that {\phi} is a Freiman isomorphism of order (say) {8} on {[N]^d}.)

Now let {\tilde f: {\bf Z} \rightarrow [-1,1]} be the function defined by setting {\tilde f( \phi(n) ) := f(n)} whenever {n \in [N]^d}, with {\tilde f} vanishing outside of {\phi([N]^d)}. If {f} obeys (1), then from the above Freiman isomorphism property we have

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{d(s+2)}} \sum_{n, h_1,\dots,h_{s+1} \in {\bf Z}} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} \tilde f(n+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}) \geq \delta.

Applying the one-dimensional inverse theorem (Theorem 1), with {\delta} reduced by a factor of {d 10^d} and {N} replaced by {d 10^d N^d}, this implies the existence of a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta,d}(1)}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta,d}(1)} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{d(s+2)}} \sum_{n \in {\bf Z}} \tilde f(n) F(g(n) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta,d} 1

which by the Freiman isomorphism property again implies that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{d(s+2)}} \sum_{n \in {\bf Z}^d} f(n) F(g(\phi(n)) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta,d} 1.

But the map {n \mapsto g(\phi(n))} is clearly a polynomial map from {{\bf Z}^d} to {G} (the composition of two polynomial maps is polynomial, see e.g. Appendix B of my paper with Ben and Tammy), and the claim follows.

Remark 3 This trick appears to be largely restricted to the case of boundedly generated groups such as {{\bf Z}^d}; I do not see any easy way to deduce an inverse theorem for, say, {\bigcup_{n=1}^\infty {\mathbb F}_p^n} from the {{\bf Z}}-inverse theorem by this method.

Remark 4 By combining this argument with the one in the previous post, one can obtain a weak ergodic inverse theorem for {{\bf Z}^d}-actions. Interestingly, the Freiman isomorphism argument appears to be difficult to implement directly in the ergodic category; in particular, there does not appear to be an obvious direct way to derive the Host-Kra inverse theorem for {{\bf Z}^d} actions (a result first obtained in the PhD thesis of Griesmer) from the counterpart for {{\bf Z}} actions.

Note: this post is of a particularly technical nature, in particular presuming familiarity with nilsequences, nilsystems, characteristic factors, etc., and is primarily intended for experts.

As mentioned in the previous post, Ben Green, Tamar Ziegler, and myself proved the following inverse theorem for the Gowers norms:

Theorem 1 (Inverse theorem for Gowers norms) Let {N \geq 1} and {s \geq 1} be integers, and let {\delta > 0}. Suppose that {f: {\bf Z} \rightarrow [-1,1]} is a function supported on {[N] := \{1,\dots,N\}} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N^{s+2}} \sum_{n,h_1,\dots,h_{s+1}} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(n+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}) \geq \delta.

Then there exists a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta}(1)}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta}(1)} such that

\displaystyle \frac{1}{N} \sum_n f(n) F(g(n) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta} 1.

This result was conjectured earlier by Ben Green and myself; this conjecture was strongly motivated by an analogous inverse theorem in ergodic theory by Host and Kra, which we formulate here in a form designed to resemble Theorem 1 as closely as possible:

Theorem 2 (Inverse theorem for Gowers-Host-Kra seminorms) Let {s \geq 1} be an integer, and let {(X, T)} be an ergodic, countably generated measure-preserving system. Suppose that one has

\displaystyle \lim_{N \rightarrow \infty} \frac{1}{N^{s+1}} \sum_{h_1,\dots,h_{s+1} \in [N]} \int_X \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(T^{\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}}x)\ d\mu(x)

\displaystyle > 0

for all non-zero {f \in L^\infty(X)} (all {L^p} spaces are real-valued in this post). Then {(X,T)} is an inverse limit (in the category of measure-preserving systems, up to almost everywhere equivalence) of ergodic degree {\leq s} nilsystems, that is to say systems of the form {(G/\Gamma, x \mapsto gx)} for some degree {\leq s} filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} and a group element {g \in G} that acts ergodically on {G/\Gamma}.

It is a natural question to ask if there is any logical relationship between the two theorems. In the finite field category, one can deduce the combinatorial inverse theorem from the ergodic inverse theorem by a variant of the Furstenberg correspondence principle, as worked out by Tamar Ziegler and myself, however in the current context of {{\bf Z}}-actions, the connection is less clear.

One can split Theorem 2 into two components:

Theorem 3 (Weak inverse theorem for Gowers-Host-Kra seminorms) Let {s \geq 1} be an integer, and let {(X, T)} be an ergodic, countably generated measure-preserving system. Suppose that one has

\displaystyle \lim_{N \rightarrow \infty} \frac{1}{N^{s+1}} \sum_{h_1,\dots,h_{s+1} \in [N]} \int_X \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} T^{\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}} f\ d\mu

\displaystyle > 0

for all non-zero {f \in L^\infty(X)}, where {T^h f := f \circ T^h}. Then {(X,T)} is a factor of an inverse limit of ergodic degree {\leq s} nilsystems.

Theorem 4 (Pro-nilsystems closed under factors) Let {s \geq 1} be an integer. Then any factor of an inverse limit of ergodic degree {\leq s} nilsystems, is again an inverse limit of ergodic degree {\leq s} nilsystems.

Indeed, it is clear that Theorem 2 implies both Theorem 3 and Theorem 4, and conversely that the two latter theorems jointly imply the former. Theorem 4 is, in principle, purely a fact about nilsystems, and should have an independent proof, but this is not known; the only known proofs go through the full machinery needed to prove Theorem 2 (or the closely related theorem of Ziegler). (However, the fact that a factor of a nilsystem is again a nilsystem was established previously by Parry.)

The purpose of this post is to record a partial implication in reverse direction to the correspondence principle:

Proposition 5 Theorem 1 implies Theorem 3.

As mentioned at the start of the post, a fair amount of familiarity with the area is presumed here, and some routine steps will be presented with only a fairly brief explanation.

Read the rest of this entry »

A few years ago, Ben Green, Tamar Ziegler, and myself proved the following (rather technical-looking) inverse theorem for the Gowers norms:

Theorem 1 (Discrete inverse theorem for Gowers norms) Let {N \geq 1} and {s \geq 1} be integers, and let {\delta > 0}. Suppose that {f: {\bf Z} \rightarrow [-1,1]} is a function supported on {[N] := \{1,\dots,N\}} such that

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{N^{s+2}} \sum_{n,h_1,\dots,h_{s+1}} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(n+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1}) \geq \delta.

Then there exists a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta}(1)}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta}(1)} such that

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{N} \sum_n f(n) F(g(n) \Gamma) \gg_{s,\delta} 1.

For the definitions of “filtered nilmanifold”, “degree”, “complexity”, and “polynomial sequence”, see the paper of Ben, Tammy, and myself. (I should caution the reader that this blog post will presume a fair amount of familiarity with this subfield of additive combinatorics.) This result has a number of applications, for instance to establishing asymptotics for linear equations in the primes, but this will not be the focus of discussion here.

The purpose of this post is to record the observation that this “discrete” inverse theorem, together with an equidistribution theorem for nilsequences that Ben and I worked out in a separate paper, implies a continuous version:

Theorem 2 (Continuous inverse theorem for Gowers norms) Let {s \geq 1} be an integer, and let {\delta>0}. Suppose that {f: {\bf R} \rightarrow [-1,1]} is a measurable function supported on {[0,1]} such that

\displaystyle  \int_{{\bf R}^{s+1}} \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^{s+1}} f(t+\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_{s+1} h_{s+1})\ dt dh_1 \dots dh_{s+1} \geq \delta. \ \ \ \ \ (1)

Then there exists a filtered nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of degree {\leq s} and complexity {O_{s,\delta}(1)}, a (smooth) polynomial sequence {g: {\bf R} \rightarrow G}, and a Lipschitz function {F: G/\Gamma \rightarrow {\bf R}} of Lipschitz constant {O_{s,\delta}(1)} such that

\displaystyle  \int_{\bf R} f(t) F(g(t) \Gamma)\ dt \gg_{s,\delta} 1.

The interval {[0,1]} can be easily replaced with any other fixed interval by a change of variables. A key point here is that the bounds are completely uniform in the choice of {f}. Note though that the coefficients of {g} can be arbitrarily large (and this is necessary, as can be seen just by considering functions of the form {f(t) = \cos( \xi t)} for some arbitrarily large frequency {\xi}).

It is likely that one could prove Theorem 2 by carefully going through the proof of Theorem 1 and replacing all instances of {{\bf Z}} with {{\bf R}} (and making appropriate modifications to the argument to accommodate this). However, the proof of Theorem 1 is quite lengthy. Here, we shall proceed by the usual limiting process of viewing the continuous interval {[0,1]} as a limit of the discrete interval {\frac{1}{N} \cdot [N]} as {N \rightarrow \infty}. However there will be some problems taking the limit due to a failure of compactness, and specifically with regards to the coefficients of the polynomial sequence {g: {\bf N} \rightarrow G} produced by Theorem 1, after normalising these coefficients by {N}. Fortunately, a factorisation theorem from a paper of Ben Green and myself resolves this problem by splitting {g} into a “smooth” part which does enjoy good compactness properties, as well as “totally equidistributed” and “periodic” parts which can be eliminated using the measurability (and thus, approximate smoothness), of {f}.

Read the rest of this entry »

Szemerédi’s theorem asserts that any subset of the integers of positive upper density contains arbitrarily large arithmetic progressions. Here is an equivalent quantitative form of this theorem:

Theorem 1 (Szemerédi’s theorem) Let {N} be a positive integer, and let {f: {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z} \rightarrow [0,1]} be a function with {{\bf E}_{x \in {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} f(x) \geq \delta} for some {\delta>0}, where we use the averaging notation {{\bf E}_{x \in A} f(x) := \frac{1}{|A|} \sum_{x \in A} f(x)}, {{\bf E}_{x,r \in A} f(x) := \frac{1}{|A|^2} \sum_{x, r \in A} f(x)}, etc.. Then for {k \geq 3} we have

\displaystyle  {\bf E}_{x,r \in {\bf Z}/N{\bf Z}} f(x) f(x+r) \dots f(x+(k-1)r) \geq c(k,\delta)

for some {c(k,\delta)>0} depending only on {k,\delta}.

The equivalence is basically thanks to an averaging argument of Varnavides; see for instance Chapter 11 of my book with Van Vu or this previous blog post for a discussion. We have removed the cases {k=1,2} as they are trivial and somewhat degenerate.

There are now many proofs of this theorem. Some time ago, I took an ergodic-theoretic proof of Furstenberg and converted it to a purely finitary proof of the theorem. The argument used some simplifying innovations that had been developed since the original work of Furstenberg (in particular, deployment of the Gowers uniformity norms, as well as a “dual” norm that I called the uniformly almost periodic norm, and an emphasis on van der Waerden’s theorem for handling the “compact extension” component of the argument). But the proof was still quite messy. However, as discussed in this previous blog post, messy finitary proofs can often be cleaned up using nonstandard analysis. Thus, there should be a nonstandard version of the Furstenberg ergodic theory argument that is relatively clean. I decided (after some encouragement from Ben Green and Isaac Goldbring) to write down most of the details of this argument in this blog post, though for sake of brevity I will skim rather quickly over arguments that were already discussed at length in other blog posts. In particular, I will presume familiarity with nonstandard analysis (in particular, the notion of a standard part of a bounded real number, and the Loeb measure construction), see for instance this previous blog post for a discussion.

Read the rest of this entry »

The von Neumann ergodic theorem (the Hilbert space version of the mean ergodic theorem) asserts that if {U: H \rightarrow H} is a unitary operator on a Hilbert space {H}, and {v \in H} is a vector in that Hilbert space, then one has

\displaystyle \lim_{N \rightarrow \infty} \frac{1}{N} \sum_{n=1}^N U^n v = \pi_{H^U} v

in the strong topology, where {H^U := \{ w \in H: Uw = w \}} is the {U}-invariant subspace of {H}, and {\pi_{H^U}} is the orthogonal projection to {H^U}. (See e.g. these previous lecture notes for a proof.) The same proof extends to more general amenable groups: if {G} is a countable amenable group acting on a Hilbert space {H} by unitary transformations {T^g: H \rightarrow H} for {g \in G}, and {v \in H} is a vector in that Hilbert space, then one has

\displaystyle \lim_{N \rightarrow \infty} \mathop{\bf E}_{g \in \Phi_N} T^g v = \pi_{H^G} v \ \ \ \ \ (1)

 

for any Folner sequence {\Phi_N} of {G}, where {H^G := \{ w \in H: T^g w = w \hbox{ for all }g \in G \}} is the {G}-invariant subspace, and {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f(a) := \frac{1}{|A|} \sum_{a \in A} f(a)} is the average of {f} on {A}. Thus one can interpret {\pi_{H^G} v} as a certain average of elements of the orbit {Gv := \{ T^g v: g \in G \}} of {v}.

In a previous blog post, I noted a variant of this ergodic theorem (due to Alaoglu and Birkhoff) that holds even when the group {G} is not amenable (or not discrete), using a more abstract notion of averaging:

Theorem 1 (Abstract ergodic theorem) Let {G} be an arbitrary group acting unitarily on a Hilbert space {H}, and let {v} be a vector in {H}. Then {\pi_{H^G} v} is the element in the closed convex hull of {Gv := \{ T^g v: g \in G \}} of minimal norm, and is also the unique element of {H^G} in this closed convex hull.

I recently stumbled upon a different way to think about this theorem, in the additive case {G = (G,+)} when {G} is abelian, which has a closer resemblance to the classical mean ergodic theorem. Given an arbitrary additive group {G = (G,+)} (not necessarily discrete, or countable), let {{\mathcal F}} denote the collection of finite non-empty multisets in {G} – that is to say, unordered collections {\{a_1,\dots,a_n\}} of elements {a_1,\dots,a_n} of {G}, not necessarily distinct, for some positive integer {n}. Given two multisets {A = \{a_1,\dots,a_n\}}, {B = \{b_1,\dots,b_m\}} in {{\mathcal F}}, we can form the sum set {A + B := \{ a_i + b_j: 1 \leq i \leq n, 1 \leq j \leq m \}}. Note that the sum set {A+B} can contain multiplicity even when {A, B} do not; for instance, {\{ 1,2\} + \{1,2\} = \{2,3,3,4\}}. Given a multiset {A = \{a_1,\dots,a_n\}} in {{\mathcal F}}, and a function {f: G \rightarrow H} from {G} to a vector space {H}, we define the average {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f(a)} as

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f(a) = \frac{1}{n} \sum_{j=1}^n f(a_j).

Note that the multiplicity function of the set {A} affects the average; for instance, we have {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in \{1,2\}} a = \frac{3}{2}}, but {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in \{1,2,2\}} a = \frac{5}{3}}.

We can define a directed set on {{\mathcal F}} as follows: given two multisets {A,B \in {\mathcal F}}, we write {A \geq B} if we have {A = B+C} for some {C \in {\mathcal F}}. Thus for instance we have {\{ 1, 2, 2, 3\} \geq \{1,2\}}. It is easy to verify that this operation is transitive and reflexive, and is directed because any two elements {A,B} of {{\mathcal F}} have a common upper bound, namely {A+B}. (This is where we need {G} to be abelian.) The notion of convergence along a net, now allows us to define the notion of convergence along {{\mathcal F}}; given a family {x_A} of points in a topological space {X} indexed by elements {A} of {{\mathcal F}}, and a point {x} in {X}, we say that {x_A} converges to {x} along {{\mathcal F}} if, for every open neighbourhood {U} of {x} in {X}, one has {x_A \in U} for sufficiently large {A}, that is to say there exists {B \in {\mathcal F}} such that {x_A \in U} for all {A \geq B}. If the topological space {V} is Hausdorff, then the limit {x} is unique (if it exists), and we then write

\displaystyle x = \lim_{A \rightarrow G} x_A.

When {x_A} takes values in the reals, one can also define the limit superior or limit inferior along such nets in the obvious fashion.

We can then give an alternate formulation of the abstract ergodic theorem in the abelian case:

Theorem 2 (Abelian abstract ergodic theorem) Let {G = (G,+)} be an arbitrary additive group acting unitarily on a Hilbert space {H}, and let {v} be a vector in {H}. Then we have

\displaystyle \pi_{H^G} v = \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v

in the strong topology of {H}.

Proof: Suppose that {A \geq B}, so that {A=B+C} for some {C \in {\mathcal F}}, then

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v = \mathop{\bf E}_{c \in C} T^c ( \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in B} T^b v )

so by unitarity and the triangle inequality we have

\displaystyle \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H \leq \| \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in B} T^b v \|_H,

thus {\| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H^2} is monotone non-increasing in {A}. Since this quantity is bounded between {0} and {\|v\|_H}, we conclude that the limit {\lim_{A \rightarrow G} \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H^2} exists. Thus, for any {\varepsilon > 0}, we have for sufficiently large {A} that

\displaystyle \| \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in B} T^b v \|_H^2 \geq \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H^2 - \varepsilon

for all {B \geq A}. In particular, for any {g \in G}, we have

\displaystyle \| \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in A + \{0,g\}} T^b v \|_H^2 \geq \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H^2 - \varepsilon.

We can write

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in A + \{0,g\}} T^b v = \frac{1}{2} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v + \frac{1}{2} T^g \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v

and so from the parallelogram law and unitarity we have

\displaystyle \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v - T^g \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v \|_H^2 \leq 4 \varepsilon

for all {g \in G}, and hence by the triangle inequality (averaging {g} over a finite multiset {C})

\displaystyle \| \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v - \mathop{\bf E}_{b \in A+C} T^b v \|_H^2 \leq 4 \varepsilon

for any {C \in {\mathcal F}}. This shows that {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v} is a Cauchy sequence in {H} (in the strong topology), and hence (by the completeness of {H}) tends to a limit. Shifting {A} by a group element {g}, we have

\displaystyle \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v = \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A + \{g\}} T^a v = T^g \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v

and hence {\lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v} is invariant under shifts, and thus lies in {H^G}. On the other hand, for any {w \in H^G} and {A \in {\mathcal F}}, we have

\displaystyle \langle \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v, w \rangle_H = \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} \langle v, T^{-a} w \rangle_H = \langle v, w \rangle_H

and thus on taking strong limits

\displaystyle \langle \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v, w \rangle_H = \langle v, w \rangle_H

and so {v - \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v} is orthogonal to {H^G}. Combining these two facts we see that {\lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^a v} is equal to {\pi_{H^G} v} as claimed. \Box

To relate this result to the classical ergodic theorem, we observe

Lemma 3 Let {G} be a countable additive group, with a F{\o}lner sequence {\Phi_n}, and let {f_g} be a bounded sequence in a normed vector space indexed by {G}. If {\lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f_a} exists, then {\lim_{n \rightarrow \infty} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in \Phi_n} f_a} exists, and the two limits are equal.

Proof: From the F{\o}lner property, we see that for any {A} and any {\varepsilon>0}, the averages {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in \Phi_n} f_a} and {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A+\Phi_n} f_a} differ by at most {\varepsilon} in norm if {n} is sufficiently large depending on {A}, {\varepsilon} (and the {f_a}). On the other hand, by the existence of the limit {\lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f_a}, the averages {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} f_a} and {\mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A + \Phi_n} f_a} differ by at most {\varepsilon} in norm if {A} is sufficiently large depending on {\varepsilon} (regardless of how large {n} is). The claim follows. \Box

It turns out that this approach can also be used as an alternate way to construct the GowersHost-Kra seminorms in ergodic theory, which has the feature that it does not explicitly require any amenability on the group {G} (or separability on the underlying measure space), though, as pointed out to me in comments, even uncountable abelian groups are amenable in the sense of possessing an invariant mean, even if they do not have a F{\o}lner sequence.

Given an arbitrary additive group {G}, define a {G}-system {({\mathrm X}, T)} to be a probability space {{\mathrm X} = (X, {\mathcal X}, \mu)} (not necessarily separable or standard Borel), together with a collection {T^g: X \rightarrow X} of invertible, measure-preserving maps, such that {T^0} is the identity and {T^g T^h = T^{g+h}} (modulo null sets) for all {g,h \in G}. This then gives isomorphisms {T^g: L^p({\mathrm X}) \rightarrow L^p({\mathrm X})} for {1 \leq p \leq \infty} by setting {T^g f(x) := f(T^{-g} x)}. From the above abstract ergodic theorem, we see that

\displaystyle {\mathbf E}( f | {\mathcal X}^G ) = \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{a \in A} T^g f

in the strong topology of {L^2({\mathrm X})} for any {f \in L^2({\mathrm X})}, where {{\mathcal X}^G} is the collection of measurable sets {E} that are essentially {G}-invariant in the sense that {T^g E = E} modulo null sets for all {g \in G}, and {{\mathbf E}(f|{\mathcal X}^G)} is the conditional expectation of {f} with respect to {{\mathcal X}^G}.

In a similar spirit, we have

Theorem 4 (Convergence of Gowers-Host-Kra seminorms) Let {({\mathrm X},T)} be a {G}-system for some additive group {G}. Let {d} be a natural number, and for every {\omega \in\{0,1\}^d}, let {f_\omega \in L^{2^d}({\mathrm X})}, which for simplicity we take to be real-valued. Then the expression

\displaystyle \langle (f_\omega)_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^d} \rangle_{U^d({\mathrm X})} := \lim_{A_1,\dots,A_d \rightarrow G}

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{h_1 \in A_1-A_1,\dots,h_d \in A_d-A_d} \int_X \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^d} T^{\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_d h_d} f_\omega\ d\mu

converges, where we write {\omega = (\omega_1,\dots,\omega_d)}, and we are using the product direct set on {{\mathcal F}^d} to define the convergence {A_1,\dots,A_d \rightarrow G}. In particular, for {f \in L^{2^d}({\mathrm X})}, the limit

\displaystyle \| f \|_{U^d({\mathrm X})}^{2^d} = \lim_{A_1,\dots,A_d \rightarrow G}

\displaystyle \mathop{\bf E}_{h_1 \in A_1-A_1,\dots,h_d \in A_d-A_d} \int_X \prod_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^d} T^{\omega_1 h_1 + \dots + \omega_d h_d} f\ d\mu

converges.

We prove this theorem below the fold. It implies a number of other known descriptions of the Gowers-Host-Kra seminorms {\|f\|_{U^d({\mathrm X})}}, for instance that

\displaystyle \| f \|_{U^d({\mathrm X})}^{2^d} = \lim_{A \rightarrow G} \mathop{\bf E}_{h \in A-A} \| f T^h f \|_{U^{d-1}({\mathrm X})}^{2^{d-1}}

for {d > 1}, while from the ergodic theorem we have

\displaystyle \| f \|_{U^1({\mathrm X})} = \| {\mathbf E}( f | {\mathcal X}^G ) \|_{L^2({\mathrm X})}.

This definition also manifestly demonstrates the cube symmetries of the Host-Kra measures {\mu^{[d]}} on {X^{\{0,1\}^d}}, defined via duality by requiring that

\displaystyle \langle (f_\omega)_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^d} \rangle_{U^d({\mathrm X})} = \int_{X^{\{0,1\}^d}} \bigotimes_{\omega \in \{0,1\}^d} f_\omega\ d\mu^{[d]}.

In a subsequent blog post I hope to present a more detailed study of the {U^2} norm and its relationship with eigenfunctions and the Kronecker factor, without assuming any amenability on {G} or any separability or topological structure on {{\mathrm X}}.

Read the rest of this entry »

I’ve just finished writing the first draft of my third book coming out of the 2010 blog posts, namely “Higher order Fourier analysis“, which was based primarily on my graduate course in the topic, though it also contains material from some additional posts related to linear and higher order Fourier analysis on the blog.  It is available online here.  As usual, comments and corrections are welcome.  There is also a stub page for the book, which at present does not contain much more than the above link.

 

Archives