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In graph theory, the recently developed theory of graph limits has proven to be a useful tool for analysing large dense graphs, being a convenient reformulation of the Szemerédi regularity lemma. Roughly speaking, the theory asserts that given any sequence {G_n = (V_n, E_n)} of finite graphs, one can extract a subsequence {G_{n_j} = (V_{n_j}, E_{n_j})} which converges (in a specific sense) to a continuous object known as a “graphon” – a symmetric measurable function {p\colon [0,1] \times [0,1] \rightarrow [0,1]}. What “converges” means in this context is that subgraph densities converge to the associated integrals of the graphon {p}. For instance, the edge density

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{|V_{n_j}|^2} |E_{n_j}|

converge to the integral

\displaystyle  \int_0^1 \int_0^1 p(x,y)\ dx dy,

the triangle density

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{|V_{n_j}|^3} \lvert \{ (v_1,v_2,v_3) \in V_{n_j}^3: \{v_1,v_2\}, \{v_2,v_3\}, \{v_3,v_1\} \in E_{n_j} \} \rvert

converges to the integral

\displaystyle  \int_0^1 \int_0^1 \int_0^1 p(x_1,x_2) p(x_2,x_3) p(x_3,x_1)\ dx_1 dx_2 dx_3,

the four-cycle density

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{|V_{n_j}|^4} \lvert \{ (v_1,v_2,v_3,v_4) \in V_{n_j}^4: \{v_1,v_2\}, \{v_2,v_3\}, \{v_3,v_4\}, \{v_4,v_1\} \in E_{n_j} \} \rvert

converges to the integral

\displaystyle  \int_0^1 \int_0^1 \int_0^1 \int_0^1 p(x_1,x_2) p(x_2,x_3) p(x_3,x_4) p(x_4,x_1)\ dx_1 dx_2 dx_3 dx_4,

and so forth. One can use graph limits to prove many results in graph theory that were traditionally proven using the regularity lemma, such as the triangle removal lemma, and can also reduce many asymptotic graph theory problems to continuous problems involving multilinear integrals (although the latter problems are not necessarily easy to solve!). See this text of Lovasz for a detailed study of graph limits and their applications.

One can also express graph limits (and more generally hypergraph limits) in the language of nonstandard analysis (or of ultraproducts); see for instance this paper of Elek and Szegedy, Section 6 of this previous blog post, or this paper of Towsner. (In this post we assume some familiarity with nonstandard analysis, as reviewed for instance in the previous blog post.) Here, one starts as before with a sequence {G_n = (V_n,E_n)} of finite graphs, and then takes an ultraproduct (with respect to some arbitrarily chosen non-principal ultrafilter {\alpha \in\beta {\bf N} \backslash {\bf N}}) to obtain a nonstandard graph {G_\alpha = (V_\alpha,E_\alpha)}, where {V_\alpha = \prod_{n\rightarrow \alpha} V_n} is the ultraproduct of the {V_n}, and similarly for the {E_\alpha}. The set {E_\alpha} can then be viewed as a symmetric subset of {V_\alpha \times V_\alpha} which is measurable with respect to the Loeb {\sigma}-algebra {{\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha \times V_\alpha}} of the product {V_\alpha \times V_\alpha} (see this previous blog post for the construction of Loeb measure). A crucial point is that this {\sigma}-algebra is larger than the product {{\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha} \times {\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha}} of the Loeb {\sigma}-algebra of the individual vertex set {V_\alpha}. This leads to a decomposition

\displaystyle  1_{E_\alpha} = p + e

where the “graphon” {p} is the orthogonal projection of {1_{E_\alpha}} onto {L^2( {\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha} \times {\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha} )}, and the “regular error” {e} is orthogonal to all product sets {A \times B} for {A, B \in {\mathcal L}_{V_\alpha}}. The graphon {p\colon V_\alpha \times V_\alpha \rightarrow [0,1]} then captures the statistics of the nonstandard graph {G_\alpha}, in exact analogy with the more traditional graph limits: for instance, the edge density

\displaystyle  \hbox{st} \frac{1}{|V_\alpha|^2} |E_\alpha|

(or equivalently, the limit of the {\frac{1}{|V_n|^2} |E_n|} along the ultrafilter {\alpha}) is equal to the integral

\displaystyle  \int_{V_\alpha} \int_{V_\alpha} p(x,y)\ d\mu_{V_\alpha}(x) d\mu_{V_\alpha}(y)

where {d\mu_V} denotes Loeb measure on a nonstandard finite set {V}; the triangle density

\displaystyle  \hbox{st} \frac{1}{|V_\alpha|^3} \lvert \{ (v_1,v_2,v_3) \in V_\alpha^3: \{v_1,v_2\}, \{v_2,v_3\}, \{v_3,v_1\} \in E_\alpha \} \rvert

(or equivalently, the limit along {\alpha} of the triangle densities of {E_n}) is equal to the integral

\displaystyle  \int_{V_\alpha} \int_{V_\alpha} \int_{V_\alpha} p(x_1,x_2) p(x_2,x_3) p(x_3,x_1)\ d\mu_{V_\alpha}(x_1) d\mu_{V_\alpha}(x_2) d\mu_{V_\alpha}(x_3),

and so forth. Note that with this construction, the graphon {p} is living on the Cartesian square of an abstract probability space {V_\alpha}, which is likely to be inseparable; but it is possible to cut down the Loeb {\sigma}-algebra on {V_\alpha} to minimal countable {\sigma}-algebra for which {p} remains measurable (up to null sets), and then one can identify {V_\alpha} with {[0,1]}, bringing this construction of a graphon in line with the traditional notion of a graphon. (See Remark 5 of this previous blog post for more discussion of this point.)

Additive combinatorics, which studies things like the additive structure of finite subsets {A} of an abelian group {G = (G,+)}, has many analogies and connections with asymptotic graph theory; in particular, there is the arithmetic regularity lemma of Green which is analogous to the graph regularity lemma of Szemerédi. (There is also a higher order arithmetic regularity lemma analogous to hypergraph regularity lemmas, but this is not the focus of the discussion here.) Given this, it is natural to suspect that there is a theory of “additive limits” for large additive sets of bounded doubling, analogous to the theory of graph limits for large dense graphs. The purpose of this post is to record a candidate for such an additive limit. This limit can be used as a substitute for the arithmetic regularity lemma in certain results in additive combinatorics, at least if one is willing to settle for qualitative results rather than quantitative ones; I give a few examples of this below the fold.

It seems that to allow for the most flexible and powerful manifestation of this theory, it is convenient to use the nonstandard formulation (among other things, it allows for full use of the transfer principle, whereas a more traditional limit formulation would only allow for a transfer of those quantities continuous with respect to the notion of convergence). Here, the analogue of a nonstandard graph is an ultra approximate group {A_\alpha} in a nonstandard group {G_\alpha = \prod_{n \rightarrow \alpha} G_n}, defined as the ultraproduct of finite {K}-approximate groups {A_n \subset G_n} for some standard {K}. (A {K}-approximate group {A_n} is a symmetric set containing the origin such that {A_n+A_n} can be covered by {K} or fewer translates of {A_n}.) We then let {O(A_\alpha)} be the external subgroup of {G_\alpha} generated by {A_\alpha}; equivalently, {A_\alpha} is the union of {A_\alpha^m} over all standard {m}. This space has a Loeb measure {\mu_{O(A_\alpha)}}, defined by setting

\displaystyle \mu_{O(A_\alpha)}(E_\alpha) := \hbox{st} \frac{|E_\alpha|}{|A_\alpha|}

whenever {E_\alpha} is an internal subset of {A_\alpha^m} for any standard {m}, and extended to a countably additive measure; the arguments in Section 6 of this previous blog post can be easily modified to give a construction of this measure.

The Loeb measure {\mu_{O(A_\alpha)}} is a translation invariant measure on {O(A_{\alpha})}, normalised so that {A_\alpha} has Loeb measure one. As such, one should think of {O(A_\alpha)} as being analogous to a locally compact abelian group equipped with a Haar measure. It should be noted though that {O(A_\alpha)} is not actually a locally compact group with Haar measure, for two reasons:

  • There is not an obvious topology on {O(A_\alpha)} that makes it simultaneously locally compact, Hausdorff, and {\sigma}-compact. (One can get one or two out of three without difficulty, though.)
  • The addition operation {+\colon O(A_\alpha) \times O(A_\alpha) \rightarrow O(A_\alpha)} is not measurable from the product Loeb algebra {{\mathcal L}_{O(A_\alpha)} \times {\mathcal L}_{O(A_\alpha)}} to {{\mathcal L}_{O(\alpha)}}. Instead, it is measurable from the coarser Loeb algebra {{\mathcal L}_{O(A_\alpha) \times O(A_\alpha)}} to {{\mathcal L}_{O(\alpha)}} (compare with the analogous situation for nonstandard graphs).

Nevertheless, the analogy is a useful guide for the arguments that follow.

Let {L(O(A_\alpha))} denote the space of bounded Loeb measurable functions {f\colon O(A_\alpha) \rightarrow {\bf C}} (modulo almost everywhere equivalence) that are supported on {A_\alpha^m} for some standard {m}; this is a complex algebra with respect to pointwise multiplication. There is also a convolution operation {\star\colon L(O(A_\alpha)) \times L(O(A_\alpha)) \rightarrow L(O(A_\alpha))}, defined by setting

\displaystyle  \hbox{st} f \star \hbox{st} g(x) := \hbox{st} \frac{1}{|A_\alpha|} \sum_{y \in A_\alpha^m} f(y) g(x-y)

whenever {f\colon A_\alpha^m \rightarrow {}^* {\bf C}}, {g\colon A_\alpha^l \rightarrow {}^* {\bf C}} are bounded nonstandard functions (extended by zero to all of {O(A_\alpha)}), and then extending to arbitrary elements of {L(O(A_\alpha))} by density. Equivalently, {f \star g} is the pushforward of the {{\mathcal L}_{O(A_\alpha) \times O(A_\alpha)}}-measurable function {(x,y) \mapsto f(x) g(y)} under the map {(x,y) \mapsto x+y}.

The basic structural theorem is then as follows.

Theorem 1 (Kronecker factor) Let {A_\alpha} be an ultra approximate group. Then there exists a (standard) locally compact abelian group {G} of the form

\displaystyle  G = {\bf R}^d \times {\bf Z}^m \times T

for some standard {d,m} and some compact abelian group {T}, equipped with a Haar measure {\mu_G} and a measurable homomorphism {\pi\colon O(A_\alpha) \rightarrow G} (using the Loeb {\sigma}-algebra on {O(A_\alpha)} and the Baire {\sigma}-algebra on {G}), with the following properties:

  • (i) {\pi} has dense image, and {\mu_G} is the pushforward of Loeb measure {\mu_{O(A_\alpha)}} by {\pi}.
  • (ii) There exists sets {\{0\} \subset U_0 \subset K_0 \subset G} with {U_0} open and {K_0} compact, such that

    \displaystyle  \pi^{-1}(U_0) \subset 4A_\alpha \subset \pi^{-1}(K_0). \ \ \ \ \ (1)

  • (iii) Whenever {K \subset U \subset G} with {K} compact and {U} open, there exists a nonstandard finite set {B} such that

    \displaystyle  \pi^{-1}(K) \subset B \subset \pi^{-1}(U). \ \ \ \ \ (2)

  • (iv) If {f, g \in L}, then we have the convolution formula

    \displaystyle  f \star g = \pi^*( (\pi_* f) \star (\pi_* g) ) \ \ \ \ \ (3)

    where {\pi_* f,\pi_* g} are the pushforwards of {f,g} to {L^2(G, \mu_G)}, the convolution {\star} on the right-hand side is convolution using {\mu_G}, and {\pi^*} is the pullback map from {L^2(G,\mu_G)} to {L^2(O(A_\alpha), \mu_{O(A_\alpha)})}. In particular, if {\pi_* f = 0}, then {f*g=0} for all {g \in L}.

One can view the locally compact abelian group {G} as a “model “or “Kronecker factor” for the ultra approximate group {A_\alpha} (in close analogy with the Kronecker factor from ergodic theory). In the case that {A_\alpha} is a genuine nonstandard finite group rather than an ultra approximate group, the non-compact components {{\bf R}^d \times {\bf Z}^m} of the Kronecker group {G} are trivial, and this theorem was implicitly established by Szegedy. The compact group {T} is quite large, and in particular is likely to be inseparable; but as with the case of graphons, when one is only studying at most countably many functions {f}, one can cut down the size of this group to be separable (or equivalently, second countable or metrisable) if desired, so one often works with a “reduced Kronecker factor” which is a quotient of the full Kronecker factor {G}. Once one is in the separable case, the Baire sigma algebra is identical with the more familiar Borel sigma algebra.

Given any sequence of uniformly bounded functions {f_n\colon A_n^m \rightarrow {\bf C}} for some fixed {m}, we can view the function {f \in L} defined by

\displaystyle  f := \pi_* \hbox{st} \lim_{n \rightarrow \alpha} f_n \ \ \ \ \ (4)

as an “additive limit” of the {f_n}, in much the same way that graphons {p\colon V_\alpha \times V_\alpha \rightarrow [0,1]} are limits of the indicator functions {1_{E_n}\colon V_n \times V_n \rightarrow \{0,1\}}. The additive limits capture some of the statistics of the {f_n}, for instance the normalised means

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{|A_n|} \sum_{x \in A_n^m} f_n(x)

converge (along the ultrafilter {\alpha}) to the mean

\displaystyle  \int_G f(x)\ d\mu_G(x),

and for three sequences {f_n,g_n,h_n\colon A_n^m \rightarrow {\bf C}} of functions, the normalised correlation

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{|A_n|^2} \sum_{x,y \in A_n^m} f_n(x) g_n(y) h_n(x+y)

converges along {\alpha} to the correlation

\displaystyle  \int_G \int_G f(x) g(y) h(x+y)\ d\mu_G(x) d\mu_G(y),

the normalised {U^2} Gowers norm

\displaystyle  ( \frac{1}{|A_n|^3} \sum_{x,y,z,w \in A_n^m: x+w=y+z} f_n(x) \overline{f_n(y)} \overline{f_n(z)} f_n(w))^{1/4}

converges along {\alpha} to the {U^2} Gowers norm

\displaystyle  ( \int_{G \times G \times G} f(x) \overline{f(y)} \overline{f(z)} f_n(x+y-z)\ d\mu_G(x) d\mu_G(y) d\mu_G(z))^{1/4}

and so forth. We caution however that some correlations that involve evaluating more than one function at the same point will not necessarily be preserved in the additive limit; for instance the normalised {\ell^2} norm

\displaystyle  (\frac{1}{|A_n|} \sum_{x \in A_n^m} |f_n(x)|^2)^{1/2}

does not necessarily converge to the {L^2} norm

\displaystyle  (\int_G |f(x)|^2\ d\mu_G(x))^{1/2},

but can converge instead to a larger quantity, due to the presence of the orthogonal projection {\pi_*} in the definition (4) of {f}.

An important special case of an additive limit occurs when the functions {f_n\colon A_n^m \rightarrow {\bf C}} involved are indicator functions {f_n = 1_{E_n}} of some subsets {E_n} of {A_n^m}. The additive limit {f \in L} does not necessarily remain an indicator function, but instead takes values in {[0,1]} (much as a graphon {p} takes values in {[0,1]} even though the original indicators {1_{E_n}} take values in {\{0,1\}}). The convolution {f \star f\colon G \rightarrow [0,1]} is then the ultralimit of the normalised convolutions {\frac{1}{|A_n|} 1_{E_n} \star 1_{E_n}}; in particular, the measure of the support of {f \star f} provides a lower bound on the limiting normalised cardinality {\frac{1}{|A_n|} |E_n + E_n|} of a sumset. In many situations this lower bound is an equality, but this is not necessarily the case, because the sumset {2E_n = E_n + E_n} could contain a large number of elements which have very few ({o(|A_n|)}) representations as the sum of two elements of {E_n}, and in the limit these portions of the sumset fall outside of the support of {f \star f}. (One can think of the support of {f \star f} as describing the “essential” sumset of {2E_n = E_n + E_n}, discarding those elements that have only very few representations.) Similarly for higher convolutions of {f}. Thus one can use additive limits to partially control the growth {k E_n} of iterated sumsets of subsets {E_n} of approximate groups {A_n}, in the regime where {k} stays bounded and {n} goes to infinity.

Theorem 1 can be proven by Fourier-analytic means (combined with Freiman’s theorem from additive combinatorics), and we will do so below the fold. For now, we give some illustrative examples of additive limits.

Example 2 (Bohr sets) We take {A_n} to be the intervals {A_n := \{ x \in {\bf Z}: |x| \leq N_n \}}, where {N_n} is a sequence going to infinity; these are {2}-approximate groups for all {n}. Let {\theta} be an irrational real number, let {I} be an interval in {{\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, and for each natural number {n} let {B_n} be the Bohr set

\displaystyle  B_n := \{ x \in A^{(n)}: \theta x \hbox{ mod } 1 \in I \}.

In this case, the (reduced) Kronecker factor {G} can be taken to be the infinite cylinder {{\bf R} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z}} with the usual Lebesgue measure {\mu_G}. The additive limits of {1_{A_n}} and {1_{B_n}} end up being {1_A} and {1_B}, where {A} is the finite cylinder

\displaystyle  A := \{ (x,t) \in {\bf R} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: x \in [-1,1]\}

and {B} is the rectangle

\displaystyle  B := \{ (x,t) \in {\bf R} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: x \in [-1,1]; t \in I \}.

Geometrically, one should think of {A_n} and {B_n} as being wrapped around the cylinder {{\bf R} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z}} via the homomorphism {x \mapsto (\frac{x}{N_n}, \theta x \hbox{ mod } 1)}, and then one sees that {B_n} is converging in some normalised weak sense to {B}, and similarly for {A_n} and {A}. In particular, the additive limit predicts the growth rate of the iterated sumsets {kB_n} to be quadratic in {k} until {k|I|} becomes comparable to {1}, at which point the growth transitions to linear growth, in the regime where {k} is bounded and {n} is large.

If {\theta = \frac{p}{q}} were rational instead of irrational, then one would need to replace {{\bf R}/{\bf Z}} by the finite subgroup {\frac{1}{q}{\bf Z}/{\bf Z}} here.

Example 3 (Structured subsets of progressions) We take {A_n} be the rank two progression

\displaystyle  A_n := \{ a + b N_n^2: a,b \in {\bf Z}; |a|, |b| \leq N_n \},

where {N_n} is a sequence going to infinity; these are {4}-approximate groups for all {n}. Let {B_n} be the subset

\displaystyle  B_n := \{ a + b N_n^2: a,b \in {\bf Z}; |a|^2 + |b|^2 \leq N_n^2 \}.

Then the (reduced) Kronecker factor can be taken to be {G = {\bf R}^2} with Lebesgue measure {\mu_G}, and the additive limits of the {1_{A_n}} and {1_{B_n}} are then {1_A} and {1_B}, where {A} is the square

\displaystyle  A := \{ (a,b) \in {\bf R}^2: |a|, |b| \leq 1 \}

and {B} is the circle

\displaystyle  B := \{ (a,b) \in {\bf R}^2: a^2+b^2 \leq 1 \}.

Geometrically, the picture is similar to the Bohr set one, except now one uses a Freiman homomorphism {a + b N_n^2 \mapsto (\frac{a}{N_n}, \frac{b}{N_n})} for {a,b = O( N_n )} to embed the original sets {A_n, B_n} into the plane {{\bf R}^2}. In particular, one now expects the growth rate of the iterated sumsets {k A_n} and {k B_n} to be quadratic in {k}, in the regime where {k} is bounded and {n} is large.

Example 4 (Dissociated sets) Let {d} be a fixed natural number, and take

\displaystyle  A_n = \{0, v_1,\dots,v_d,-v_1,\dots,-v_d \}

where {v_1,\dots,v_d} are randomly chosen elements of a large cyclic group {{\bf Z}/p_n{\bf Z}}, where {p_n} is a sequence of primes going to infinity. These are {O(d)}-approximate groups. The (reduced) Kronecker factor {G} can (almost surely) then be taken to be {{\bf Z}^d} with counting measure, and the additive limit of {1_{A_n}} is {1_A}, where {A = \{ 0, e_1,\dots,e_d,-e_1,\dots,-e_d\}} and {e_1,\dots,e_d} is the standard basis of {{\bf Z}^d}. In particular, the growth rates of {k A_n} should grow approximately like {k^d} for {k} bounded and {n} large.

Example 5 (Random subsets of groups) Let {A_n = G_n} be a sequence of finite additive groups whose order is going to infinity. Let {B_n} be a random subset of {G_n} of some fixed density {0 \leq \lambda \leq 1}. Then (almost surely) the Kronecker factor here can be reduced all the way to the trivial group {\{0\}}, and the additive limit of the {1_{B_n}} is the constant function {\lambda}. The convolutions {\frac{1}{|G_n|} 1_{B_n} * 1_{B_n}} then converge in the ultralimit (modulo almost everywhere equivalence) to the pullback of {\lambda^2}; this reflects the fact that {(1-o(1))|G_n|} of the elements of {G_n} can be represented as the sum of two elements of {B_n} in {(\lambda^2 + o(1)) |G_n|} ways. In particular, {B_n+B_n} occupies a proportion {1-o(1)} of {G_n}.

Example 6 (Trigonometric series) Take {A_n = G_n = {\bf Z}/p_n {\bf C}} for a sequence {p_n} of primes going to infinity, and for each {n} let {\xi_{n,1},\xi_{n,2},\dots} be an infinite sequence of frequencies chosen uniformly and independently from {{\bf Z}/p_n{\bf Z}}. Let {f_n\colon {\bf Z}/p_n{\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf C}} denote the random trigonometric series

\displaystyle  f_n(x) := \sum_{j=1}^\infty 2^{-j} e^{2\pi i \xi_{n,j} x / p_n }.

Then (almost surely) we can take the reduced Kronecker factor {G} to be the infinite torus {({\bf R}/{\bf Z})^{\bf N}} (with the Haar probability measure {\mu_G}), and the additive limit of the {f_n} then becomes the function {f\colon ({\bf R}/{\bf Z})^{\bf N} \rightarrow {\bf R}} defined by the formula

\displaystyle  f( (x_j)_{j=1}^\infty ) := \sum_{j=1}^\infty e^{2\pi i x_j}.

In fact, the pullback {\pi^* f} is the ultralimit of the {f_n}. As such, for any standard exponent {1 \leq q < \infty}, the normalised {l^q} norm

\displaystyle  (\frac{1}{p_n} \sum_{x \in {\bf Z}/p_n{\bf Z}} |f_n(x)|^q)^{1/q}

can be seen to converge to the limit

\displaystyle  (\int_{({\bf R}/{\bf Z})^{\bf N}} |f(x)|^q\ d\mu_G(x))^{1/q}.

The reader is invited to consider combinations of the above examples, e.g. random subsets of Bohr sets, to get a sense of the general case of Theorem 1.

It is likely that this theorem can be extended to the noncommutative setting, using the noncommutative Freiman theorem of Emmanuel Breuillard, Ben Green, and myself, but I have not attempted to do so here (see though this recent preprint of Anush Tserunyan for some related explorations); in a separate direction, there should be extensions that can control higher Gowers norms, in the spirit of the work of Szegedy.

Note: the arguments below will presume some familiarity with additive combinatorics and with nonstandard analysis, and will be a little sketchy in places.

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