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Louis Esser, Burt Totaro, Chengxi Wang, and myself have just uploaded to the arXiv our preprint “Varieties of general type with many vanishing plurigenera, and optimal sine and sawtooth inequalities“. This is an interdisciplinary paper that arose because in order to optimize a certain algebraic geometry construction it became necessary to solve a purely analytic question which, while simple, did not seem to have been previously studied in the literature. We were able to solve the analytic question exactly and thus fully optimize the algebraic geometry construction, though the analytic question may have some independent interest.

Let us first discuss the algebraic geometry application. Given a smooth complex {n}-dimensional projective variety {X} there is a standard line bundle {K_X} attached to it, known as the canonical line bundle; {n}-forms on the variety become sections of this bundle. The bundle may not actually admit global sections; that is to say, the dimension {h^0(X, K_X)} of global sections may vanish. But as one raises the canonical line bundle {K_X} to higher and higher powers to form further line bundles {mK_X}, the number of global sections tends to increase; in particular, the dimension {h^0(X, mK_X)} of global sections (known as the {m^{th}} plurigenus) always obeys an asymptotic of the form

\displaystyle  h^0(X, mK_X) = \mathrm{vol}(X) \frac{m^n}{n!} + O( m^{n-1} )

as {m \rightarrow \infty} for some non-negative number {\mathrm{vol}(X)}, which is called the volume of the variety {X}, which is an invariant that reveals some information about the birational geometry of {X}. For instance, if the canonical line bundle is ample (or more generally, nef), this volume is equal to the intersection number {K_X^n} (roughly speaking, the number of common zeroes of {n} generic sections of the canonical line bundle); this is a special case of the asymptotic Riemann-Roch theorem. In particular, the volume {\mathrm{vol}(X)} is a natural number in this case. However, it is possible for the volume to also be fractional in nature. One can then ask: how small can the volume get {\mathrm{vol}(X)} without vanishing entirely? (By definition, varieties with non-vanishing volume are known as varieties of general type.)

It follows from a deep result obtained independently by Hacon–McKernan, Takayama and Tsuji that there is a uniform lower bound for the volume {\mathrm{vol}(X)} of all {n}-dimensional projective varieties of general type. However, the precise lower bound is not known, and the current paper is a contribution towards probing this bound by constructing varieties of particularly small volume in the high-dimensional limit {n \rightarrow \infty}. Prior to this paper, the best such constructions of {n}-dimensional varieties basically had exponentially small volume, with a construction of volume at most {e^{-(1+o(1))n \log n}} given by Ballico–Pignatelli–Tasin, and an improved construction with a volume bound of {e^{-\frac{1}{3} n \log^2 n}} given by Totaro and Wang. In this paper, we obtain a variant construction with the somewhat smaller volume bound of {e^{-(1-o(1)) n^{3/2} \log^{1/2} n}}; the method also gives comparable bounds for some other related algebraic geometry statistics, such as the largest {m} for which the pluricanonical map associated to the linear system {|mK_X|} is not a birational embedding into projective space.

The space {X} is constructed by taking a general hypersurface of a certain degree {d} in a weighted projective space {P(a_0,\dots,a_{n+1})} and resolving the singularities. These varieties are relatively tractable to work with, as one can use standard algebraic geometry tools (such as the ReidTai inequality) to provide sufficient conditions to guarantee that the hypersurface has only canonical singularities and that the canonical bundle is a reflexive sheaf, which allows one to calculate the volume exactly in terms of the degree {d} and weights {a_0,\dots,a_{n+1}}. The problem then reduces to optimizing the resulting volume given the constraints needed for the above-mentioned sufficient conditions to hold. After working with a particular choice of weights (which consist of products of mostly consecutive primes, with each product occuring with suitable multiplicities {c_0,\dots,c_{b-1}}), the problem eventually boils down to trying to minimize the total multiplicity {\sum_{j=0}^{b-1} c_j}, subject to certain congruence conditions and other bounds on the {c_j}. Using crude bounds on the {c_j} eventually leads to a construction with volume at most {e^{-0.8 n^{3/2} \log^{1/2} n}}, but by taking advantage of the ability to “dilate” the congruence conditions and optimizing over all dilations, we are able to improve the {0.8} constant to {1-o(1)}.

Now it is time to turn to the analytic side of the paper by describing the optimization problem that we solve. We consider the sawtooth function {g: {\bf R} \rightarrow (-1/2,1/2]}, with {g(x)} defined as the unique real number in {(-1/2,1/2]} that is equal to {x} mod {1}. We consider a (Borel) probability measure {\mu} on the real line, and then compute the average value of this sawtooth function

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(x) := \int_{\bf R} g(x)\ d\mu(x)

as well as various dilates

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx) := \int_{\bf R} g(kx)\ d\mu(x)

of this expectation. Since {g} is bounded above by {1/2}, we certainly have the trivial bound

\displaystyle  \min_{1 \leq k \leq m} \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx) \leq \frac{1}{2}.

However, this bound is not very sharp. For instance, the only way in which {\mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(x)} could attain the value of {1/2} is if the probability measure {\mu} was supported on half-integers, but in that case {\mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(2x)} would vanish. For the algebraic geometry application discussed above one is then led to the following question: for a given choice of {m}, what is the best upper bound {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m} on the quantity {\min_{1 \leq k \leq m} \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx)} that holds for all probability measures {\mu}?

If one considers the deterministic case in which {\mu} is a Dirac mass supported at some real number {x_0}, then the Dirichlet approximation theorem tells us that there is {1 \leq k \leq m} such that {x_0} is within {\frac{1}{m+1}} of an integer, so we have

\displaystyle  \min_{1 \leq k \leq m} \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx) \leq \frac{1}{m+1}

in this case, and this bound is sharp for deterministic measures {\mu}. Thus we have

\displaystyle  \frac{1}{m+1} \leq c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m \leq \frac{1}{2}.

However, both of these bounds turn out to be far from the truth, and the optimal value of {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m} is comparable to {\frac{\log 2}{\log m}}. In fact we were able to compute this quantity precisely:

Theorem 1 (Optimal bound for sawtooth inequality) Let {m \geq 1}.
  • (i) If {m = 2^r} for some natural number {r}, then {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m = \frac{1}{r+2}}.
  • (ii) If {2^r < m \leq 2^{r+1}} for some natural number {r}, then {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m = \frac{2^r}{2^r(r+1) + m}}.
In particular, we have {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m = \frac{\log 2 + o(1)}{\log m}} as {m \rightarrow \infty}.

We establish this bound through duality. Indeed, suppose we could find non-negative coefficients {a_1,\dots,a_m} such that one had the pointwise bound

\displaystyle  \sum_{k=1}^m a_k g(kx) \leq 1 \ \ \ \ \ (1)

for all real numbers {x}. Integrating this against an arbitrary probability measure {\mu}, we would conclude

\displaystyle  (\sum_{k=1}^m a_k) \min_{1 \leq k \leq m} \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx) \leq \sum_{k=1}^m a_k \mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx) \leq 1

and hence

\displaystyle  c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m \leq \frac{1}{\sum_{k=1}^m a_k}.

Conversely, one can find lower bounds on {c^{\mathrm{saw}}_m} by selecting suitable candidate measures {\mu} and computing the means {\mathop{\bf E}_\mu g(kx)}. The theory of linear programming duality tells us that this method must give us the optimal bound, but one has to locate the optimal measure {\mu} and optimal weights {a_1,\dots,a_m}. This we were able to do by first doing some extensive numerics to discover these weights and measures for small values of {m}, and then doing some educated guesswork to extrapolate these examples to the general case, and then to verify the required inequalities. In case (i) the situation is particularly simple, as one can take {\mu} to be the discrete measure that assigns a probability {\frac{1}{r+2}} to the numbers {\frac{1}{2}, \frac{1}{4}, \dots, \frac{1}{2^r}} and the remaining probability of {\frac{2}{r+2}} to {\frac{1}{2^{r+1}}}, while the optimal weighted inequality (1) turns out to be

\displaystyle  2g(x) + \sum_{j=1}^r g(2^j x) \leq 1

which is easily proven by telescoping series. However the general case turned out to be significantly tricker to work out, and the verification of the optimal inequality required a delicate case analysis (reflecting the fact that equality was attained in this inequality in a large number of places).

After solving the sawtooth problem, we became interested in the analogous question for the sine function, that is to say what is the best bound {c^{\sin}_m} for the inequality

\displaystyle  \min_{1 \leq k \leq m} \mathop{\bf E}_\mu \sin(kx) \leq c^{\sin}_m.

The left-hand side is the smallest imaginary part of the first {m} Fourier coefficients of {\mu}. To our knowledge this quantity has not previously been studied in the Fourier analysis literature. By adopting a similar approach as for the sawtooth problem, we were able to compute this quantity exactly also:

Theorem 2 For any {m \geq 1}, one has

\displaystyle  c^{\sin}_m = \frac{m+1}{2 \sum_{1 \leq j \leq m: j \hbox{ odd}} \cot \frac{\pi j}{2m+2}}.

In particular,

\displaystyle  c^{\sin}_m = \frac{\frac{\pi}{2} + o(1)}{\log m}.

Interestingly, a closely related cotangent sum recently appeared in this MathOverflow post. Verifying the lower bound on {c^{\sin}_m} boils down to choosing the right test measure {\mu}; it turns out that one should pick the probability measure supported the {\frac{\pi j}{2m+2}} with {1 \leq j \leq m} odd, with probability proportional to {\cot \frac{\pi j}{2m+2}}, and the lower bound verification eventually follows from a classical identity

\displaystyle  \frac{m+1}{2} = \sum_{1 \leq j \leq m; j \hbox{ odd}} \cot \frac{\pi j}{2m+2} \sin \frac{\pi jk}{m+1}

for {1 \leq k \leq m}, first posed by Eisenstein in 1844 and proved by Stern in 1861. The upper bound arises from establishing the trigonometric inequality

\displaystyle  \frac{2}{(m+1)^2} \sum_{1 \leq k \leq m; k \hbox{ odd}}

\displaystyle \cot \frac{\pi k}{2m+2} ( (m+1-k) \sin kx + k \sin(m+1-k)x ) \leq 1

for all real numbers {x}, which to our knowledge is new; the left-hand side has a Fourier-analytic intepretation as convolving the Fejér kernel with a certain discretized square wave function, and this interpretation is used heavily in our proof of the inequality.

Joni Teräväinen and myself have just uploaded to the arXiv our preprint “Quantitative bounds for Gowers uniformity of the Möbius and von Mangoldt functions“. This paper makes quantitative the Gowers uniformity estimates on the Möbius function {\mu} and the von Mangoldt function {\Lambda}.

To discuss the results we first discuss the situation of the Möbius function, which is technically simpler in some (though not all) ways. We assume familiarity with Gowers norms and standard notations around these norms, such as the averaging notation {\mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]}} and the exponential notation {e(\theta) = e^{2\pi i \theta}}. The prime number theorem in qualitative form asserts that

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) = o(1)

as {N \rightarrow \infty}. With Vinogradov-Korobov error term, the prime number theorem is strengthened to

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) \ll \exp( - c \log^{3/5} N (\log \log N)^{-1/5} );

we refer to such decay bounds (With {\exp(-c\log^c N)} type factors) as pseudopolynomial decay. Equivalently, we obtain pseudopolynomial decay of Gowers {U^1} seminorm of {\mu}:

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^1([N])} \ll \exp( - c \log^{3/5} N (\log \log N)^{-1/5} ).

As is well known, the Riemann hypothesis would be equivalent to an upgrade of this estimate to polynomial decay of the form

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^1([N])} \ll_\varepsilon N^{-1/2+\varepsilon}

for any {\varepsilon>0}.

Once one restricts to arithmetic progressions, the situation gets worse: the Siegel-Walfisz theorem gives the bound

\displaystyle  \| \mu 1_{a \hbox{ mod } q}\|_{U^1([N])} \ll_A \log^{-A} N \ \ \ \ \ (1)

for any residue class {a \hbox{ mod } q} and any {A>0}, but with the catch that the implied constant is ineffective in {A}. This ineffectivity cannot be removed without further progress on the notorious Siegel zero problem.

In 1937, Davenport was able to show the discorrelation estimate

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) e(-\alpha n) \ll_A \log^{-A} N

for any {A>0} uniformly in {\alpha \in {\bf R}}, which leads (by standard Fourier arguments) to the Fourier uniformity estimate

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^2([N])} \ll_A \log^{-A} N.

Again, the implied constant is ineffective. If one insists on effective constants, the best bound currently available is

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^2([N])} \ll \log^{-c} N \ \ \ \ \ (2)

for some small effective constant {c>0}.

For the situation with the {U^3} norm the previously known results were much weaker. Ben Green and I showed that

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \ll_{A,F,G/\Gamma} \log^{-A} N \ \ \ \ \ (3)

uniformly for any {A>0}, any degree two (filtered) nilmanifold {G/\Gamma}, any polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and any Lipschitz function {F}; again, the implied constants are ineffective. On the other hand, in a separate paper of Ben Green and myself, we established the following inverse theorem: if for instance we knew that

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^3([N])} \geq \delta

for some {0 < \delta < 1/2}, then there exists a degree two nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of dimension {O( \delta^{-O(1)} )}, complexity {O( \delta^{-O(1)} )}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and Lipschitz function {F} of Lipschitz constant {O(\delta^{-O(1)})} such that

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \gg \exp(-\delta^{-O(1)}).

Putting the two assertions together and comparing all the dependencies on parameters, one can establish the qualitative decay bound

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^3([N])} = o(1).

However the decay rate {o(1)} produced by this argument is completely ineffective: obtaining a bound on when this {o(1)} quantity dips below a given threshold {\delta} depends on the implied constant in (3) for some {G/\Gamma} whose dimension depends on {\delta}, and the dependence on {\delta} obtained in this fashion is ineffective in the face of a Siegel zero.

For higher norms {U^k, k \geq 3}, the situation is even worse, because the quantitative inverse theory for these norms is poorer, and indeed it was only with the recent work of Manners that any such bound is available at all (at least for {k>4}). Basically, Manners establishes if

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^k([N])} \geq \delta

then there exists a degree {k-1} nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} of dimension {O( \delta^{-O(1)} )}, complexity {O( \exp\exp(\delta^{-O(1)}) )}, a polynomial sequence {g: {\bf Z} \rightarrow G}, and Lipschitz function {F} of Lipschitz constant {O(\exp\exp(\delta^{-O(1)}))} such that

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \gg \exp\exp(-\delta^{-O(1)}).

(We allow all implied constants to depend on {k}.) Meanwhile, the bound (3) was extended to arbitrary nilmanifolds by Ben and myself. Again, the two results when concatenated give the qualitative decay

\displaystyle  \| \mu \|_{U^k([N])} = o(1)

but the decay rate is completely ineffective.

Our first result gives an effective decay bound:

Theorem 1 For any {k \geq 2}, we have {\| \mu \|_{U^k([N])} \ll (\log\log N)^{-c_k}} for some {c_k>0}. The implied constants are effective.

This is off by a logarithm from the best effective bound (2) in the {k=2} case. In the {k=3} case there is some hope to remove this logarithm based on the improved quantitative inverse theory currently available in this case, but there is a technical obstruction to doing so which we will discuss later in this post. For {k>3} the above bound is the best one could hope to achieve purely using the quantitative inverse theory of Manners.

We have analogues of all the above results for the von Mangoldt function {\Lambda}. Here a complication arises that {\Lambda} does not have mean close to zero, and one has to subtract off some suitable approximant {\Lambda^\sharp} to {\Lambda} before one would expect good Gowers norms bounds. For the prime number theorem one can just use the approximant {1}, giving

\displaystyle  \| \Lambda - 1 \|_{U^1([N])} \ll \exp( - c \log^{3/5} N (\log \log N)^{-1/5} )

but even for the prime number theorem in arithmetic progressions one needs a more accurate approximant. In our paper it is convenient to use the “Cramér approximant”

\displaystyle  \Lambda_{\hbox{Cram\'er}}(n) := \frac{W}{\phi(W)} 1_{(n,W)=1}

where

\displaystyle  W := \prod_{p<Q} p

and {Q} is the quasipolynomial quantity

\displaystyle  Q = \exp(\log^{1/10} N). \ \ \ \ \ (4)

Then one can show from the Siegel-Walfisz theorem and standard bilinear sum methods that

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} (\Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Cram\'er}}(n)) e(-\alpha n) \ll_A \log^{-A} N

and

\displaystyle  \| \Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Cram\'er}}\|_{U^2([N])} \ll_A \log^{-A} N

for all {A>0} and {\alpha \in {\bf R}} (with an ineffective dependence on {A}), again regaining effectivity if {A} is replaced by a sufficiently small constant {c>0}. All the previously stated discorrelation and Gowers uniformity results for {\mu} then have analogues for {\Lambda}, and our main result is similarly analogous:

Theorem 2 For any {k \geq 2}, we have {\| \Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Cram\'er}} \|_{U^k([N])} \ll (\log\log N)^{-c_k}} for some {c_k>0}. The implied constants are effective.

By standard methods, this result also gives quantitative asymptotics for counting solutions to various systems of linear equations in primes, with error terms that gain a factor of {O((\log\log N)^{-c})} with respect to the main term.

We now discuss the methods of proof, focusing first on the case of the Möbius function. Suppose first that there is no “Siegel zero”, by which we mean a quadratic character {\chi} of some conductor {q \leq Q} with a zero {L(\beta,\chi)} with {1 - \beta \leq \frac{c}{\log Q}} for some small absolute constant {c>0}. In this case the Siegel-Walfisz bound (1) improves to a quasipolynomial bound

\displaystyle  \| \mu 1_{a \hbox{ mod } q}\|_{U^1([N])} \ll \exp(-\log^c N). \ \ \ \ \ (5)

To establish Theorem 1 in this case, it suffices by Manners’ inverse theorem to establish the polylogarithmic bound

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} \mu(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \ll \exp(-\log^c N) \ \ \ \ \ (6)

for all degree {k-1} nilmanifolds {G/\Gamma} of dimension {O((\log\log N)^c)} and complexity {O( \exp(\log^c N))}, all polynomial sequences {g}, and all Lipschitz functions {F} of norm {O( \exp(\log^c N))}. If the nilmanifold {G/\Gamma} had bounded dimension, then one could repeat the arguments of Ben and myself more or less verbatim to establish this claim from (5), which relied on the quantitative equidistribution theory on nilmanifolds developed in a separate paper of Ben and myself. Unfortunately, in the latter paper the dependence of the quantitative bounds on the dimension {d} was not explicitly given. In an appendix to the current paper, we go through that paper to account for this dependence, showing that all exponents depend at most doubly exponentially in the dimension {d}, which is barely sufficient to handle the dimension of {O((\log\log N)^c)} that arises here.

Now suppose we have a Siegel zero {L(\beta,\chi)}. In this case the bound (5) will not hold in general, and hence also (6) will not hold either. Here, the usual way out (while still maintaining effective estimates) is to approximate {\mu} not by {0}, but rather by a more complicated approximant {\mu_{\hbox{Siegel}}} that takes the Siegel zero into account, and in particular is such that one has the (effective) pseudopolynomial bound

\displaystyle  \| (\mu - \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}}) 1_{a \hbox{ mod } q}\|_{U^1([N])} \ll \exp(-\log^c N) \ \ \ \ \ (7)

for all residue classes {a \hbox{ mod } q}. The Siegel approximant to {\mu} is actually a little bit complicated, and to our knowledge the first appearance of this sort of approximant only appears as late as this 2010 paper of Germán and Katai. Our version of this approximant is defined as the multiplicative function such that

\displaystyle \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}}(p^j) = \mu(p^j)

when {p < Q}, and

\displaystyle  \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}}(n) = \alpha n^{\beta-1} \chi(n)

when {n} is coprime to all primes {p<Q}, and {\alpha} is a normalising constant given by the formula

\displaystyle  \alpha := \frac{1}{L'(\beta,\chi)} \prod_{p<Q} (1-\frac{1}{p})^{-1} (1 - \frac{\chi(p)}{p^\beta})^{-1}

(this constant ends up being of size {O(1)} and plays only a minor role in the analysis). This is a rather complicated formula, but it seems to be virtually the only choice of approximant that allows for bounds such as (7) to hold. (This is the one aspect of the problem where the von Mangoldt theory is simpler than the Möbius theory, as in the former one only needs to work with very rough numbers for which one does not need to make any special accommodations for the behavior at small primes when introducing the Siegel correction term.) With this starting point it is then possible to repeat the analysis of my previous papers with Ben and obtain the pseudopolynomial discorrelation bound

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} (\mu - \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}})(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \ll \exp(-\log^c N)

for {F(g(n)\Gamma)} as before, which when combined with Manners’ inverse theorem gives the doubly logarithmic bound

\displaystyle \| \mu - \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}} \|_{U^k([N])} \ll (\log\log N)^{-c_k}.

Meanwhile, a direct sieve-theoretic computation ends up giving the singly logarithmic bound

\displaystyle \| \mu_{\hbox{Siegel}} \|_{U^k([N])} \ll \log^{-c_k} N

(indeed, there is a good chance that one could improve the bounds even further, though it is not helpful for this current argument to do so). Theorem 1 then follows from the triangle inequality for the Gowers norm. It is interesting that the Siegel approximant {\mu_{\hbox{Siegel}}} seems to play a rather essential component in the proof, even if it is absent in the final statement. We note that this approximant seems to be a useful tool to explore the “illusory world” of the Siegel zero further; see for instance the recent paper of Chinis for some work in this direction.

For the analogous problem with the von Mangoldt function (assuming a Siegel zero for sake of discussion), the approximant {\Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}}} is simpler; we ended up using

\displaystyle \Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}}(n) = \Lambda_{\hbox{Cram\'er}}(n) (1 - n^{\beta-1} \chi(n))

which allows one to state the standard prime number theorem in arithmetic progressions with classical error term and Siegel zero term compactly as

\displaystyle  \| (\Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}}) 1_{a \hbox{ mod } q}\|_{U^1([N])} \ll \exp(-\log^c N).

Routine modifications of previous arguments also give

\displaystyle  \mathop{\bf E}_{n \in [N]} (\Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}})(n) \overline{F}(g(n) \Gamma) \ll \exp(-\log^c N) \ \ \ \ \ (8)

and

\displaystyle \| \Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}} \|_{U^k([N])} \ll \log^{-c_k} N.

The one tricky new step is getting from the discorrelation estimate (8) to the Gowers uniformity estimate

\displaystyle \| \Lambda - \Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}} \|_{U^k([N])} \ll (\log\log N)^{-c_k}.

One cannot directly apply Manners’ inverse theorem here because {\Lambda} and {\Lambda_{\hbox{Siegel}}} are unbounded. There is a standard tool for getting around this issue, now known as the dense model theorem, which is the standard engine powering the transference principle from theorems about bounded functions to theorems about certain types of unbounded functions. However the quantitative versions of the dense model theorem in the literature are expensive and would basically weaken the doubly logarithmic gain here to a triply logarithmic one. Instead, we bypass the dense model theorem and directly transfer the inverse theorem for bounded functions to an inverse theorem for unbounded functions by using the densification approach to transference introduced by Conlon, Fox, and Zhao. This technique turns out to be quantitatively quite efficient (the dependencies of the main parameters in the transference are polynomial in nature), and also has the technical advantage of avoiding the somewhat tricky “correlation condition” present in early transference results which are also not beneficial for quantitative bounds.

In principle, the above results can be improved for {k=3} due to the stronger quantitative inverse theorems in the {U^3} setting. However, there is a bottleneck that prevents us from achieving this, namely that the equidistribution theory of two-step nilmanifolds has exponents which are exponential in the dimension rather than polynomial in the dimension, and as a consequence we were unable to improve upon the doubly logarithmic results. Specifically, if one is given a sequence of bracket quadratics such as {\lfloor \alpha_1 n \rfloor \beta_1 n, \dots, \lfloor \alpha_d n \rfloor \beta_d n} that fails to be {\delta}-equidistributed, one would need to establish a nontrivial linear relationship modulo 1 between the {\alpha_1,\beta_1,\dots,\alpha_d,\beta_d} (up to errors of {O(1/N)}), where the coefficients are of size {O(\delta^{-d^{O(1)}})}; current methods only give coefficient bounds of the form {O(\delta^{-\exp(d^{O(1)})})}. An old result of Schmidt demonstrates proof of concept that these sorts of polynomial dependencies on exponents is possible in principle, but actually implementing Schmidt’s methods here seems to be a quite non-trivial task. There is also another possible route to removing a logarithm, which is to strengthen the inverse {U^3} theorem to make the dimension of the nilmanifold logarithmic in the uniformity parameter {\delta} rather than polynomial. Again, the Freiman-Bilu theorem (see for instance this paper of Ben and myself) demonstrates proof of concept that such an improvement in dimension is possible, but some work would be needed to implement it.

Kaisa Matomäki, Maksym Radziwill, Xuancheng Shao, Joni Teräväinen, and myself have just uploaded to the arXiv our preprint “Singmaster’s conjecture in the interior of Pascal’s triangle“. This paper leverages the theory of exponential sums over primes to make progress on a well known conjecture of Singmaster which asserts that any natural number larger than {1} appears at most a bounded number of times in Pascal’s triangle. That is to say, for any integer {t \geq 2}, there are at most {O(1)} solutions to the equation

\displaystyle  \binom{n}{m} = t \ \ \ \ \ (1)

with {1 \leq m < n}. Currently, the largest number of solutions that is known to be attainable is eight, with {t} equal to

\displaystyle  3003 = \binom{3003}{1} = \binom{78}{2} = \binom{15}{5} = \binom{14}{6} = \binom{14}{8} = \binom{15}{10}

\displaystyle = \binom{78}{76} = \binom{3003}{3002}.

Because of the symmetry {\binom{n}{m} = \binom{n}{n-m}} of Pascal’s triangle it is natural to restrict attention to the left half {1 \leq m \leq n/2} of the triangle.

Our main result settles this conjecture in the “interior” region of the triangle:

Theorem 1 (Singmaster’s conjecture in the interior of the triangle) If {0 < \varepsilon < 1} and {t} is sufficiently large depending on {\varepsilon}, there are at most two solutions to (1) in the region

\displaystyle  \exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n ) \leq m \leq n/2 \ \ \ \ \ (2)

and hence at most four in the region

\displaystyle  \exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n ) \leq m \leq n - \exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n ).

Also, there is at most one solution in the region

\displaystyle  \exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n ) \leq m \leq n/\exp(\log^{1-\varepsilon} n ).

To verify Singmaster’s conjecture in full, it thus suffices in view of this result to verify the conjecture in the boundary region

\displaystyle  2 \leq m < \exp(\log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n) \ \ \ \ \ (3)

(or equivalently {n - \exp(\log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n) < m \leq n}); we have deleted the {m=1} case as it of course automatically supplies exactly one solution to (1). It is in fact possible that for {t} sufficiently large there are no further collisions {\binom{n}{m} = \binom{n'}{m'}=t} for {(n,m), (n',m')} in the region (3), in which case there would never be more than eight solutions to (1) for sufficiently large {t}. This is latter claim known for bounded values of {m,m'} by Beukers, Shorey, and Tildeman, with the main tool used being Siegel’s theorem on integral points.

The upper bound of two here for the number of solutions in the region (2) is best possible, due to the infinite family of solutions to the equation

\displaystyle  \binom{n+1}{m+1} = \binom{n}{m+2} \ \ \ \ \ (4)

coming from {n = F_{2j+2} F_{2j+3}-1}, {m = F_{2j} F_{2j+3}-1} and {F_j} is the {j^{th}} Fibonacci number.

The appearance of the quantity {\exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n )} in Theorem 1 may be familiar to readers that are acquainted with Vinogradov’s bounds on exponential sums, which ends up being the main new ingredient in our arguments. In principle this threshold could be lowered if we had stronger bounds on exponential sums.

To try to control solutions to (1) we use a combination of “Archimedean” and “non-Archimedean” approaches. In the “Archimedean” approach (following earlier work of Kane on this problem) we view {n,m} primarily as real numbers rather than integers, and express (1) in terms of the Gamma function as

\displaystyle  \frac{\Gamma(n+1)}{\Gamma(m+1) \Gamma(n-m+1)} = t.

One can use this equation to solve for {n} in terms of {m,t} as

\displaystyle  n = f_t(m)

for a certain real analytic function {f_t} whose asymptotics are easily computable (for instance one has the asymptotic {f_t(m) \asymp m t^{1/m}}). One can then view the problem as one of trying to control the number of lattice points on the graph {\{ (m,f_t(m)): m \in {\bf R} \}}. Here we can take advantage of the fact that in the regime {m \leq f_t(m)/2} (which corresponds to working in the left half {m \leq n/2} of Pascal’s triangle), the function {f_t} can be shown to be convex, but not too convex, in the sense that one has both upper and lower bounds on the second derivative of {f_t} (in fact one can show that {f''_t(m) \asymp f_t(m) (\log t/m^2)^2}). This can be used to preclude the possibility of having a cluster of three or more nearby lattice points on the graph {\{ (m,f_t(m)): m \in {\bf R} \}}, basically because the area subtended by the triangle connecting three of these points would lie between {0} and {1/2}, contradicting Pick’s theorem. Developing these ideas, we were able to show

Proposition 2 Let {\varepsilon>0}, and suppose {t} is sufficiently large depending on {\varepsilon}. If {(m,n)} is a solution to (1) in the left half {m \leq n/2} of Pascal’s triangle, then there is at most one other solution {(m',n')} to this equation in the left half with

\displaystyle  |m-m'| + |n-n'| \ll \exp( (\log\log t)^{1-\varepsilon} ).

Again, the example of (4) shows that a cluster of two solutions is certainly possible; the convexity argument only kicks in once one has a cluster of three or more solutions.

To finish the proof of Theorem 1, one has to show that any two solutions {(m,n), (m',n')} to (1) in the region of interest must be close enough for the above proposition to apply. Here we switch to the “non-Archimedean” approach, in which we look at the {p}-adic valuations {\nu_p( \binom{n}{m} )} of the binomial coefficients, defined as the number of times a prime {p} divides {\binom{n}{m}}. From the fundamental theorem of arithmetic, a collision

\displaystyle  \binom{n}{m} = \binom{n'}{m'}

between binomial coefficients occurs if and only if one has agreement of valuations

\displaystyle  \nu_p( \binom{n}{m} ) = \nu_p( \binom{n'}{m'} ). \ \ \ \ \ (5)

From the Legendre formula

\displaystyle  \nu_p(n!) = \sum_{j=1}^\infty \lfloor \frac{n}{p^j} \rfloor

we can rewrite this latter identity (5) as

\displaystyle  \sum_{j=1}^\infty \{ \frac{m}{p^j} \} + \{ \frac{n-m}{p^j} \} - \{ \frac{n}{p^j} \} = \sum_{j=1}^\infty \{ \frac{m'}{p^j} \} + \{ \frac{n'-m'}{p^j} \} - \{ \frac{n'}{p^j} \}, \ \ \ \ \ (6)

where {\{x\} := x - \lfloor x\rfloor} denotes the fractional part of {x}. (These sums are not truly infinite, because the summands vanish once {p^j} is larger than {\max(n,n')}.)

A key idea in our approach is to view this condition (6) statistically, for instance by viewing {p} as a prime drawn randomly from an interval such as {[P, P + P \log^{-100} P]} for some suitably chosen scale parameter {P}, so that the two sides of (6) now become random variables. It then becomes advantageous to compare correlations between these two random variables and some additional test random variable. For instance, if {n} and {n'} are far apart from each other, then one would expect the left-hand side of (6) to have a higher correlation with the fractional part {\{ \frac{n}{p}\}}, since this term shows up in the summation on the left-hand side but not the right. Similarly if {m} and {m'} are far apart from each other (although there are some annoying cases one has to treat separately when there is some “unexpected commensurability”, for instance if {n'-m'} is a rational multiple of {m} where the rational has bounded numerator and denominator). In order to execute this strategy, it turns out (after some standard Fourier expansion) that one needs to get good control on exponential sums such as

\displaystyle  \sum_{P \leq p \leq P + P\log^{-100} P} e( \frac{N}{p} + \frac{M}{p^j} )

for various choices of parameters {P, N, M, j}, where {e(\theta) := e^{2\pi i \theta}}. Fortunately, the methods of Vinogradov (which more generally can handle sums such as {\sum_{n \in I} e(f(n))} and {\sum_{p \in I} e(f(p))} for various analytic functions {f}) can give useful bounds on such sums as long as {N} and {M} are not too large compared to {P}; more specifically, Vinogradov’s estimates are non-trivial in the regime {N,M \ll \exp( \log^{3/2-\varepsilon} P )}, and this ultimately leads to a distance bound

\displaystyle  m' - m \ll_\varepsilon \exp( \log^{2/3 +\varepsilon}(n+n') )

between any colliding pair {(n,m), (n',m')} in the left half of Pascal’s triangle, as well as the variant bound

\displaystyle  n' - n \ll_\varepsilon \exp( \log^{2/3 +\varepsilon}(n+n') )

under the additional assumption

\displaystyle  m', m \geq \exp( \log^{2/3 +\varepsilon}(n+n') ).

Comparing these bounds with Proposition 2 and using some basic estimates about the function {f_t}, we can conclude Theorem 1.

A modification of the arguments also gives similar results for the equation

\displaystyle  (n)_m = t \ \ \ \ \ (7)

where {(n)_m := n (n-1) \dots (n-m+1)} is the falling factorial:

Theorem 3 If {0 < \varepsilon < 1} and {t} is sufficiently large depending on {\varepsilon}, there are at most two solutions to (7) in the region

\displaystyle  \exp( \log^{2/3+\varepsilon} n ) \leq m < n. \ \ \ \ \ (8)

Again the upper bound of two is best possible, thanks to identities such as

\displaystyle  (a^2-a)_{a^2-2a} = (a^2-a-1)_{a^2-2a+1}.

Marcel Filoche, Svitlana Mayboroda, and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our preprint “The effective potential of an {M}-matrix“. This paper explores the analogue of the effective potential of Schrödinger operators {-\Delta + V} provided by the “landscape function” {u}, when one works with a certain type of self-adjoint matrix known as an {M}-matrix instead of a Schrödinger operator.

Suppose one has an eigenfunction

\displaystyle  (-\Delta + V) \phi = E \phi

of a Schrödinger operator {-\Delta+V}, where {\Delta} is the Laplacian on {{\bf R}^d}, {V: {\bf R}^d \rightarrow {\bf R}} is a potential, and {E} is an energy. Where would one expect the eigenfunction {\phi} to be concentrated? If the potential {V} is smooth and slowly varying, the correspondence principle suggests that the eigenfunction {\phi} should be mostly concentrated in the potential energy wells {\{ x: V(x) \leq E \}}, with an exponentially decaying amount of tunnelling between the wells. One way to rigorously establish such an exponential decay is through an argument of Agmon, which we will sketch later in this post, which gives an exponentially decaying upper bound (in an {L^2} sense) of eigenfunctions {\phi} in terms of the distance to the wells {\{ V \leq E \}} in terms of a certain “Agmon metric” on {{\bf R}^d} determined by the potential {V} and energy level {E} (or any upper bound {\overline{E}} on this energy). Similar exponential decay results can also be obtained for discrete Schrödinger matrix models, in which the domain {{\bf R}^d} is replaced with a discrete set such as the lattice {{\bf Z}^d}, and the Laplacian {\Delta} is replaced by a discrete analogue such as a graph Laplacian.

When the potential {V} is very “rough”, as occurs for instance in the random potentials arising in the theory of Anderson localisation, the Agmon bounds, while still true, become very weak because the wells {\{ V \leq E \}} are dispersed in a fairly dense fashion throughout the domain {{\bf R}^d}, and the eigenfunction can tunnel relatively easily between different wells. However, as was first discovered in 2012 by my two coauthors, in these situations one can replace the rough potential {V} by a smoother effective potential {1/u}, with the eigenfunctions typically localised to a single connected component of the effective wells {\{ 1/u \leq E \}}. In fact, a good choice of effective potential comes from locating the landscape function {u}, which is the solution to the equation {(-\Delta + V) u = 1} with reasonable behavior at infinity, and which is non-negative from the maximum principle, and then the reciprocal {1/u} of this landscape function serves as an effective potential.

There are now several explanations for why this particular choice {1/u} is a good effective potential. Perhaps the simplest (as found for instance in this recent paper of Arnold, David, Jerison, and my two coauthors) is the following observation: if {\phi} is an eigenvector for {-\Delta+V} with energy {E}, then {\phi/u} is an eigenvector for {-\frac{1}{u^2} \mathrm{div}(u^2 \nabla \cdot) + \frac{1}{u}} with the same energy {E}, thus the original Schrödinger operator {-\Delta+V} is conjugate to a (variable coefficient, but still in divergence form) Schrödinger operator with potential {1/u} instead of {V}. Closely related to this, we have the integration by parts identity

\displaystyle  \int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla f|^2 + V |f|^2\ dx = \int_{{\bf R}^d} u^2 |\nabla(f/u)|^2 + \frac{1}{u} |f|^2\ dx \ \ \ \ \ (1)

for any reasonable function {f}, thus again highlighting the emergence of the effective potential {1/u}.

These particular explanations seem rather specific to the Schrödinger equation (continuous or discrete); we have for instance not been able to find similar identities to explain an effective potential for the bi-Schrödinger operator {\Delta^2 + V}.

In this paper, we demonstrate the (perhaps surprising) fact that effective potentials continue to exist for operators that bear very little resemblance to Schrödinger operators. Our chosen model is that of an {M}-matrix: self-adjoint positive definite matrices {A} whose off-diagonal entries are negative. This model includes discrete Schrödinger operators (with non-negative potentials) but can allow for significantly more non-local interactions. The analogue of the landscape function would then be the vector {u := A^{-1} 1}, where {1} denotes the vector with all entries {1}. Our main result, roughly speaking, asserts that an eigenvector {A \phi = E \phi} of {A} will then be exponentially localised to the “potential wells” {K := \{ j: \frac{1}{u_j} \leq E \}}, where {u_j} denotes the coordinates of the landscape function {u}. In particular, we establish the inequality

\displaystyle  \sum_k \phi_k^2 e^{2 \rho(k,K) / \sqrt{W}} ( \frac{1}{u_k} - E )_+ \leq W \max_{i,j} |a_{ij}|

if {\phi} is normalised in {\ell^2}, where the connectivity {W} is the maximum number of non-zero entries of {A} in any row or column, {a_{ij}} are the coefficients of {A}, and {\rho} is a certain moderately complicated but explicit metric function on the spatial domain. Informally, this inequality asserts that the eigenfunction {\phi_k} should decay like {e^{-\rho(k,K) / \sqrt{W}}} or faster. Indeed, our numerics show a very strong log-linear relationship between {\phi_k} and {\rho(k,K)}, although it appears that our exponent {1/\sqrt{W}} is not quite optimal. We also provide an associated localisation result which is technical to state but very roughly asserts that a given eigenvector will in fact be localised to a single connected component of {K} unless there is a resonance between two wells (by which we mean that an eigenvalue for a localisation of {A} associated to one well is extremely close to an eigenvalue for a localisation of {A} associated to another well); such localisation is also strongly supported by numerics. (Analogous results for Schrödinger operators had been previously obtained by the previously mentioned paper of Arnold, David, Jerison, and my two coauthors, and to quantum graphs in a very recent paper of Harrell and Maltsev.)

Our approach is based on Agmon’s methods, which we interpret as a double commutator method, and in particular relying on exploiting the negative definiteness of certain double commutator operators. In the case of Schrödinger operators {-\Delta+V}, this negative definiteness is provided by the identity

\displaystyle  \langle [[-\Delta+V,g],g] u, u \rangle = -2\int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla g|^2 |u|^2\ dx \leq 0 \ \ \ \ \ (2)

for any sufficiently reasonable functions {u, g: {\bf R}^d \rightarrow {\bf R}}, where we view {g} (like {V}) as a multiplier operator. To exploit this, we use the commutator identity

\displaystyle  \langle g [\psi, -\Delta+V] u, g \psi u \rangle = \frac{1}{2} \langle [[-\Delta+V, g \psi],g\psi] u, u \rangle

\displaystyle -\frac{1}{2} \langle [[-\Delta+V, g],g] \psi u, \psi u \rangle

valid for any {g,\psi,u: {\bf R}^d \rightarrow {\bf R}} after a brief calculation. The double commutator identity then tells us that

\displaystyle  \langle g [\psi, -\Delta+V] u, g \psi u \rangle \leq \int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla g|^2 |\psi u|^2\ dx.

If we choose {u} to be a non-negative weight and let {\psi := \phi/u} for an eigenfunction {\phi}, then we can write

\displaystyle  [\psi, -\Delta+V] u = [\psi, -\Delta+V - E] u = \psi (-\Delta+V - E) u

and we conclude that

\displaystyle  \int_{{\bf R}^d} \frac{(-\Delta+V-E)u}{u} |g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx \leq \int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx. \ \ \ \ \ (3)

We have considerable freedom in this inequality to select the functions {u,g}. If we select {u=1}, we obtain the clean inequality

\displaystyle  \int_{{\bf R}^d} (V-E) |g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx \leq \int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx.

If we take {g} to be a function which equals {1} on the wells {\{ V \leq E \}} but increases exponentially away from these wells, in such a way that

\displaystyle  |\nabla g|^2 \leq \frac{1}{2} (V-E) |g|^2

outside of the wells, we can obtain the estimate

\displaystyle  \int_{V > E} (V-E) |g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx \leq 2 \int_{V < E} (E-V) |\phi|^2\ dx,

which then gives an exponential type decay of {\phi} away from the wells. This is basically the classic exponential decay estimate of Agmon; one can basically take {g} to be the distance to the wells {\{ V \leq E \}} with respect to the Euclidean metric conformally weighted by a suitably normalised version of {V-E}. If we instead select {u} to be the landscape function {u = (-\Delta+V)^{-1} 1}, (3) then gives

\displaystyle  \int_{{\bf R}^d} (\frac{1}{u} - E) |g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx \leq \int_{{\bf R}^d} |\nabla g|^2 |\phi|^2\ dx,

and by selecting {g} appropriately this gives an exponential decay estimate away from the effective wells {\{ \frac{1}{u} \leq E \}}, using a metric weighted by {\frac{1}{u}-E}.

It turns out that this argument extends without much difficulty to the {M}-matrix setting. The analogue of the crucial double commutator identity (2) is

\displaystyle  \langle [[A,D],D] u, u \rangle	= \sum_{i \neq j} a_{ij} u_i u_j (d_{ii} - d_{jj})^2 \leq 0

for any diagonal matrix {D = \mathrm{diag}(d_{11},\dots,d_{NN})}. The remainder of the Agmon type arguments go through after making the natural modifications.

Numerically we have also found some aspects of the landscape theory to persist beyond the {M}-matrix setting, even though the double commutators cease being negative definite, so this may not yet be the end of the story, but it does at least demonstrate that utility the landscape does not purely rely on identities such as (1).

I’ve just uploaded to the arXiv my paper “Sendov’s conjecture for sufficiently high degree polynomials“. This paper is a contribution to an old conjecture of Sendov on the zeroes of polynomials:

Conjecture 1 (Sendov’s conjecture) Let {f: {\bf C} \rightarrow {\bf C}} be a polynomial of degree {n \geq 2} that has all zeroes in the closed unit disk {\{ z: |z| \leq 1 \}}. If {\lambda_0} is one of these zeroes, then {f'} has at least one zero in {\{z: |z-\lambda_0| \leq 1\}}.

It is common in the literature on this problem to normalise {f} to be monic, and to rotate the zero {\lambda_0} to be an element {a} of the unit interval {[0,1]}. As it turns out, the location of {a} on this unit interval {[0,1]} ends up playing an important role in the arguments.

Many cases of this conjecture are already known, for instance

In particular, in high degrees the only cases left uncovered by prior results are when {a} is close (but not too close) to {0}, or when {a} is close (but not too close) to {1}; see Figure 1 of my paper.

Our main result covers the high degree case uniformly for all values of {a \in [0,1]}:

Theorem 2 There exists an absolute constant {n_0} such that Sendov’s conjecture holds for all {n \geq n_0}.

In principle, this reduces the verification of Sendov’s conjecture to a finite time computation, although our arguments use compactness methods and thus do not easily provide an explicit value of {n_0}. I believe that the compactness arguments can be replaced with quantitative substitutes that provide an explicit {n_0}, but the value of {n_0} produced is likely to be extremely large (certainly much larger than {9}).

Because of the previous results (particularly those of Chalebgwa and Chijiwa), we will only need to establish the following two subcases of the above theorem:

Theorem 3 (Sendov’s conjecture near the origin) Under the additional hypothesis {a = o(1/\log n)}, Sendov’s conjecture holds for sufficiently large {n}.

Theorem 4 (Sendov’s conjecture near the unit circle) Under the additional hypothesis {1-o(1) \leq a \leq 1 - \varepsilon_0^n} for a fixed {\varepsilon_0>0}, Sendov’s conjecture holds for sufficiently large {n}.

We approach these theorems using the “compactness and contradiction” strategy, assuming that there is a sequence of counterexamples whose degrees {n} going to infinity, using various compactness theorems to extract various asymptotic objects in the limit {n \rightarrow \infty}, and somehow using these objects to derive a contradiction. There are many ways to effect such a strategy; we will use a formalism that I call “cheap nonstandard analysis” and which is common in the PDE literature, in which one repeatedly passes to subsequences as necessary whenever one invokes a compactness theorem to create a limit object. However, the particular choice of asymptotic formalism one selects is not of essential importance for the arguments.

I also found it useful to use the language of probability theory. Given a putative counterexample {f} to Sendov’s conjecture, let {\lambda} be a zero of {f} (chosen uniformly at random among the {n} zeroes of {f}, counting multiplicity), and let {\zeta} similarly be a uniformly random zero of {f'}. We introduce the logarithmic potentials

\displaystyle  U_\lambda(z) := {\bf E} \log \frac{1}{|z-\lambda|}; \quad U_\zeta(z) := {\bf E} \log \frac{1}{|z-\zeta|}

and the Stieltjes transforms

\displaystyle  s_\lambda(z) := {\bf E} \frac{1}{z-\lambda}; \quad s_\zeta(z) := {\bf E} \log \frac{1}{z-\zeta}.

Standard calculations using the fundamental theorem of algebra yield the basic identities

\displaystyle  U_\lambda(z) = \frac{1}{n} \log \frac{1}{|f(z)|}; \quad U_\zeta(z) = \frac{1}{n-1} \log \frac{n}{|f'(z)|}

and

\displaystyle  s_\lambda(z) = \frac{1}{n} \frac{f'(z)}{f(z)}; \quad s_\zeta(z) = \frac{1}{n-1} \frac{f''(z)}{f'(z)} \ \ \ \ \ (1)

and in particular the random variables {\lambda, \zeta} are linked to each other by the identity

\displaystyle  U_\lambda(z) - \frac{n-1}{n} U_\zeta(z) = \frac{1}{n} \log |s_\lambda(z)|. \ \ \ \ \ (2)

On the other hand, the hypotheses of Sendov’s conjecture (and the Gauss-Lucas theorem) place {\lambda,\zeta} inside the unit disk {\{ z:|z| \leq 1\}}. Applying Prokhorov’s theorem, and passing to a subsequence, one can then assume that the random variables {\lambda,\zeta} converge in distribution to some limiting random variables {\lambda^{(\infty)}, \zeta^{(\infty)}} (possibly defined on a different probability space than the original variables {\lambda,\zeta}), also living almost surely inside the unit disk. Standard potential theory then gives the convergence

\displaystyle  U_\lambda(z) \rightarrow U_{\lambda^{(\infty)}}(z); \quad U_\zeta(z) \rightarrow U_{\zeta^{(\infty)}}(z) \ \ \ \ \ (3)

and

\displaystyle  s_\lambda(z) \rightarrow s_{\lambda^{(\infty)}}(z); \quad s_\zeta(z) \rightarrow s_{\zeta^{(\infty)}}(z) \ \ \ \ \ (4)

at least in the local {L^1} sense. Among other things, we then conclude from the identity (2) and some elementary inequalities that

\displaystyle  U_{\lambda^{(\infty)}}(z) = U_{\zeta^{(\infty)}}(z)

for all {|z|>1}. This turns out to have an appealing interpretation in terms of Brownian motion: if one takes two Brownian motions in the complex plane, one originating from {\lambda^{(\infty)}} and one originating from {\zeta^{(\infty)}}, then the location where these Brownian motions first exit the unit disk {\{ z: |z| \leq 1 \}} will have the same distribution. (In our paper we actually replace Brownian motion with the closely related formalism of balayage.) This turns out to connect the random variables {\lambda^{(\infty)}}, {\zeta^{(\infty)}} quite closely to each other. In particular, with this observation and some additional arguments involving both the unique continuation property for harmonic functions and Grace’s theorem (discussed in this previous post), with the latter drawn from the prior work of Dégot, we can get very good control on these distributions:

Theorem 5
  • (i) If {a = o(1)}, then {\lambda^{(\infty)}, \zeta^{(\infty)}} almost surely lie in the semicircle {\{ e^{i\theta}: \pi/2 \leq \theta \leq 3\pi/2\}} and have the same distribution.
  • (ii) If {a = 1-o(1)}, then {\lambda^{(\infty)}} is uniformly distributed on the circle {\{ z: |z|=1\}}, and {\zeta^{(\infty)}} is almost surely zero.

In case (i) (and strengthening the hypothesis {a=o(1)} to {a=o(1/\log n)} to control some technical contributions of “outlier” zeroes of {f}), we can use this information about {\lambda^{(\infty)}} and (4) to ensure that the normalised logarithmic derivative {\frac{1}{n} \frac{f'}{f} = s_\lambda} has a non-negative winding number in a certain small (but not too small) circle around the origin, which by the argument principle is inconsistent with the hypothesis that {f} has a zero at {a = o(1)} and that {f'} has no zeroes near {a}. This is how we establish Theorem 3.

Case (ii) turns out to be more delicate. This is because there are a number of “near-counterexamples” to Sendov’s conjecture that are compatible with the hypotheses and conclusion of case (ii). The simplest such example is {f(z) = z^n - 1}, where the zeroes {\lambda} of {f} are uniformly distributed amongst the {n^{th}} roots of unity (including at {a=1}), and the zeroes of {f'} are all located at the origin. In my paper I also discuss a variant of this construction, in which {f'} has zeroes mostly near the origin, but also acquires a bounded number of zeroes at various locations {\lambda_1+o(1),\dots,\lambda_m+o(1)} inside the unit disk. Specifically, we take

\displaystyle  f(z) := \left(z + \frac{c_2}{n}\right)^{n-m} P(z) - \left(a + \frac{c_2}{n}\right)^{n-m} P(a)

where {a = 1 - \frac{c_1}{n}} for some constants {0 < c_1 < c_2} and

\displaystyle  P(z) := (z-\lambda_1) \dots (z-\lambda_m).

By a perturbative analysis to locate the zeroes of {f}, one eventually would be able to arrive at a true counterexample to Sendov’s conjecture if these locations {\lambda_1,\dots,\lambda_m} were in the open lune

\displaystyle  \{ \lambda: |\lambda| < 1 < |\lambda-1| \}

and if one had the inequality

\displaystyle  c_2 - c_1 - c_2 \cos \theta + \sum_{j=1}^m \log \left|\frac{1 - \lambda_j}{e^{i\theta} - \lambda_j}\right| < 0 \ \ \ \ \ (5)

for all {0 \leq \theta \leq 2\pi}. However, if one takes the mean of this inequality in {\theta}, one arrives at the inequality

\displaystyle  c_2 - c_1 + \sum_{j=1}^m \log |1 - \lambda_j| < 0

which is incompatible with the hypotheses {c_2 > c_1} and {|\lambda_j-1| > 1}. In order to extend this argument to more general polynomials {f}, we require a stability analysis of the endpoint equation

\displaystyle  c_2 - c_1 + c_2 \cos \theta + \sum_{j=1}^m \log \left|\frac{1 - \lambda_j}{e^{i\theta} - \lambda_j}\right| = 0 \ \ \ \ \ (6)

where we now only assume the closed conditions {c_2 \geq c_1} and {|\lambda_j-1| \geq 1}. The above discussion then places all the zeros {\lambda_j} on the arc

\displaystyle  \{ \lambda: |\lambda| < 1 = |\lambda-1|\} \ \ \ \ \ (7)

and if one also takes the second Fourier coefficient of (6) one also obtains the vanishing second moment

\displaystyle  \sum_{j=1}^m \lambda_j^2 = 0.

These two conditions are incompatible with each other (except in the degenerate case when all the {\lambda_j} vanish), because all the non-zero elements {\lambda} of the arc (7) have argument in {\pm [\pi/3,\pi/2]}, so in particular their square {\lambda^2} will have negative real part. It turns out that one can adapt this argument to the more general potential counterexamples to Sendov’s conjecture (in the form of Theorem 4). The starting point is to use (1), (4), and Theorem 5(ii) to obtain good control on {f''/f'}, which one then integrates and exponentiates to get good control on {f'}, and then on a second integration one gets enough information about {f} to pin down the location of its zeroes to high accuracy. The constraint that these zeroes lie inside the unit disk then gives an inequality resembling (5), and an adaptation of the above stability analysis is then enough to conclude. The arguments here are inspired by the previous arguments of Miller, which treated the case when {a} was extremely close to {1} via a similar perturbative analysis; the main novelty is to control the error terms not in terms of the magnitude of the largest zero {\zeta} of {f'} (which is difficult to manage when {n} gets large), but rather by the variance of those zeroes, which ends up being a more tractable expression to keep track of.

Laura Cladek and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our paper “Additive energy of regular measures in one and higher dimensions, and the fractal uncertainty principle“. This paper concerns a continuous version of the notion of additive energy. Given a finite measure {\mu} on {{\bf R}^d} and a scale {r>0}, define the energy {\mathrm{E}(\mu,r)} at scale {r} to be the quantity

\displaystyle  \mathrm{E}(\mu,r) := \mu^4\left( \{ (x_1,x_2,x_3,x_4) \in ({\bf R}^d)^4: |x_1+x_2-x_3-x_4| \leq r \}\right) \ \ \ \ \ (1)

where {\mu^4} is the product measure on {({\bf R}^d)^4} formed from four copies of the measure {\mu} on {{\bf R}^d}. We will be interested in Cantor-type measures {\mu}, supported on a compact set {X \subset B(0,1)} and obeying the Ahlfors-David regularity condition

\displaystyle  \mu(B(x,r)) \leq C r^\delta

for all balls {B(x,r)} and some constants {C, \delta > 0}, as well as the matching lower bound

\displaystyle  \mu(B(x,r)) \geq C^{-1} r^\delta

when {x \in X} whenever {0 < r < 1}. One should think of {X} as a {\delta}-dimensional fractal set, and {\mu} as some vaguely self-similar measure on this set.

Note that once one fixes {x_1,x_2,x_3}, the variable {x_4} in (1) is constrained to a ball of radius {r}, hence we obtain the trivial upper bound

\displaystyle  \mathrm{E}(\mu,r) \leq C^4 r^\delta. \ \ \ \ \ (2)

If the set {X} contains a lot of “additive structure”, one can expect this bound to be basically sharp; for instance, if {\delta} is an integer, {X} is a {\delta}-dimensional unit disk, and {\mu} is Lebesgue measure on this disk, one can verify that {\mathrm{E}(\mu,r) \sim r^\delta} (where we allow implied constants to depend on {d,\delta}. However we show that if the dimension is non-integer, then one obtains a gain:

Theorem 1 If {0 < \delta < d} is not an integer, and {X, \mu} are as above, then

\displaystyle  \mathrm{E}(\mu,r) \lesssim_{C,\delta,d} r^{\delta+\beta}

for some {\beta>0} depending only on {C,\delta,d}.

Informally, this asserts that Ahlfors-David regular fractal sets of non-integer dimension cannot behave as if they are approximately closed under addition. In fact the gain {\beta} we obtain is quasipolynomial in the regularity constant {C}:

\displaystyle  \beta = \exp\left( - O_{\delta,d}( 1 + \log^{O_{\delta,d}(1)}(C) ) \right).

(We also obtain a localised version in which the regularity condition is only required to hold at scales between {r} and {1}.) Such a result was previously obtained (with more explicit values of the {O_{\delta,d}()} implied constants) in the one-dimensional case {d=1} by Dyatlov and Zahl; but in higher dimensions there does not appear to have been any results for this general class of sets {X} and measures {\mu}. In the paper of Dyatlov and Zahl it is noted that some dependence on {C} is necessary; in particular, {\beta} cannot be much better than {1/\log C}. This reflects the fact that there are fractal sets that do behave reasonably well with respect to addition (basically because they are built out of long arithmetic progressions at many scales); however, such sets are not very Ahlfors-David regular. Among other things, this result readily implies a dimension expansion result

\displaystyle  \mathrm{dim}( f( X, X) ) \geq \delta + \beta

for any non-degenerate smooth map {f: {\bf R}^d \times {\bf R}^d \rightarrow {\bf R}^d}, including the sum map {f(x,y) := x+y} and (in one dimension) the product map {f(x,y) := x \cdot y}, where the non-degeneracy condition required is that the gradients {D_x f(x,y), D_y f(x,y): {\bf R}^d \rightarrow {\bf R}^d} are invertible for every {x,y}. We refer to the paper for the formal statement.

Our higher-dimensional argument shares many features in common with that of Dyatlov and Zahl, notably a reliance on the modern tools of additive combinatorics (and specifically the Bogulybov-Ruzsa lemma of Sanders). However, in one dimension we were also able to find a completely elementary argument, avoiding any particularly advanced additive combinatorics and instead primarily exploiting the order-theoretic properties of the real line, that gave a superior value of {\beta}, namely

\displaystyle  \beta := c \min(\delta,1-\delta) C^{-25}.

One of the main reasons for obtaining such improved energy bounds is that they imply a fractal uncertainty principle in some regimes. We focus attention on the model case of obtaining such an uncertainty principle for the semiclassical Fourier transform

\displaystyle  {\mathcal F}_h f(\xi) := (2\pi h)^{-d/2} \int_{{\bf R}^d} e^{-i x \cdot \xi/h} f(x)\ dx

where {h>0} is a small parameter. If {X, \mu, \delta} are as above, and {X_h} denotes the {h}-neighbourhood of {X}, then from the Hausdorff-Young inequality one obtains the trivial bound

\displaystyle  \| 1_{X_h} {\mathcal F}_h 1_{X_h} \|_{L^2({\bf R}^d) \rightarrow L^2({\bf R}^d)} \lesssim_{C,d} h^{\max\left(\frac{d}{2}-\delta,0\right)}.

(There are also variants involving pairs of sets {X_h, Y_h}, but for simplicity we focus on the uncertainty principle for a single set {X_h}.) The fractal uncertainty principle, when it applies, asserts that one can improve this to

\displaystyle  \| 1_{X_h} {\mathcal F}_h 1_{X_h} \|_{L^2({\bf R}^d) \rightarrow L^2({\bf R}^d)} \lesssim_{C,d} h^{\max\left(\frac{d}{2}-\delta,0\right) + \beta}

for some {\beta>0}; informally, this asserts that a function and its Fourier transform cannot simultaneously be concentrated in the set {X_h} when {\delta \leq \frac{d}{2}}, and that a function cannot be concentrated on {X_h} and have its Fourier transform be of maximum size on {X_h} when {\delta \geq \frac{d}{2}}. A modification of the disk example mentioned previously shows that such a fractal uncertainty principle cannot hold if {\delta} is an integer. However, in one dimension, the fractal uncertainty principle is known to hold for all {0 < \delta < 1}. The above-mentioned results of Dyatlov and Zahl were able to establish this for {\delta} close to {1/2}, and the remaining cases {1/2 < \delta < 1} and {0 < \delta < 1/2} were later established by Bourgain-Dyatlov and Dyatlov-Jin respectively. Such uncertainty principles have applications to hyperbolic dynamics, in particular in establishing spectral gaps for certain Selberg zeta functions.

It remains a largely open problem to establish a fractal uncertainty principle in higher dimensions. Our results allow one to establish such a principle when the dimension {\delta} is close to {d/2}, and {d} is assumed to be odd (to make {d/2} a non-integer). There is also work of Han and Schlag that obtains such a principle when one of the copies of {X_h} is assumed to have a product structure. We hope to obtain further higher-dimensional fractal uncertainty principles in subsequent work.

We now sketch how our main theorem is proved. In both one dimension and higher dimensions, the main point is to get a preliminary improvement

\displaystyle  \mathrm{E}(\mu,r_0) \leq \varepsilon r_0^\delta \ \ \ \ \ (3)

over the trivial bound (2) for any small {\varepsilon>0}, provided {r_0} is sufficiently small depending on {\varepsilon, \delta, d}; one can then iterate this bound by a fairly standard “induction on scales” argument (which roughly speaking can be used to show that energies {\mathrm{E}(\mu,r)} behave somewhat multiplicatively in the scale parameter {r}) to propagate the bound to a power gain at smaller scales. We found that a particularly clean way to run the induction on scales was via use of the Gowers uniformity norm {U^2}, and particularly via a clean Fubini-type inequality

\displaystyle  \| f \|_{U^2(V \times V')} \leq \|f\|_{U^2(V; U^2(V'))}

(ultimately proven using the Gowers-Cauchy-Schwarz inequality) that allows one to “decouple” coarse and fine scale aspects of the Gowers norms (and hence of additive energies).

It remains to obtain the preliminary improvement. In one dimension this is done by identifying some “left edges” of the set {X} that supports {\mu}: intervals {[x, x+K^{-n}]} that intersect {X}, but such that a large interval {[x-K^{-n+1},x]} just to the left of this interval is disjoint from {X}. Here {K} is a large constant and {n} is a scale parameter. It is not difficult to show (using in particular the Archimedean nature of the real line) that if one has the Ahlfors-David regularity condition for some {0 < \delta < 1} then left edges exist in abundance at every scale; for instance most points of {X} would be expected to lie in quite a few of these left edges (much as most elements of, say, the ternary Cantor set {\{ \sum_{n=1}^\infty \varepsilon_n 3^{-n} \varepsilon_n \in \{0,1\} \}} would be expected to contain a lot of {0}s in their base {3} expansion). In particular, most pairs {(x_1,x_2) \in X \times X} would be expected to lie in a pair {[x,x+K^{-n}] \times [y,y+K^{-n}]} of left edges of equal length. The key point is then that if {(x_1,x_2) \in X \times X} lies in such a pair with {K^{-n} \geq r}, then there are relatively few pairs {(x_3,x_4) \in X \times X} at distance {O(K^{-n+1})} from {(x_1,x_2)} for which one has the relation {x_1+x_2 = x_3+x_4 + O(r)}, because {x_3,x_4} will both tend to be to the right of {x_1,x_2} respectively. This causes a decrement in the energy at scale {K^{-n+1}}, and by carefully combining all these energy decrements one can eventually cobble together the energy bound (3).

We were not able to make this argument work in higher dimension (though perhaps the cases {0 < \delta < 1} and {d-1 < \delta < d} might not be completely out of reach from these methods). Instead we return to additive combinatorics methods. If the claim (3) failed, then by applying the Balog-Szemeredi-Gowers theorem we can show that the set {X} has high correlation with an approximate group {H}, and hence (by the aforementioned Bogulybov-Ruzsa type theorem of Sanders, which is the main source of the quasipolynomial bounds in our final exponent) {X} will exhibit an approximate “symmetry” along some non-trivial arithmetic progression of some spacing length {r} and some diameter {R \gg r}. The {r}-neighbourhood {X_r} of {X} will then resemble the union of parallel “cylinders” of dimensions {r \times R}. If we focus on a typical {R}-ball of {X_r}, the set now resembles a Cartesian product of an interval of length {R} with a subset of a {d-1}-dimensional hyperplane, which behaves approximately like an Ahlfors-David regular set of dimension {\delta-1} (this already lets us conclude a contradiction if {\delta<1}). Note that if the original dimension {\delta} was non-integer then this new dimension {\delta-1} will also be non-integer. It is then possible to contradict the failure of (3) by appealing to a suitable induction hypothesis at one lower dimension.

Ben Green and I have updated our paper “An arithmetic regularity lemma, an associated counting lemma, and applications” to account for a somewhat serious issue with the paper that was pointed out to us recently by Daniel Altman. This paper contains two core theorems:

  • An “arithmetic regularity lemma” that, roughly speaking, decomposes an arbitrary bounded sequence {f(n)} on an interval {\{1,\dots,N\}} as an “irrational nilsequence” {F(g(n) \Gamma)} of controlled complexity, plus some “negligible” errors (where one uses the Gowers uniformity norm as the main norm to control the neglibility of the error); and
  • An “arithmetic counting lemma” that gives an asymptotic formula for counting various averages {{\mathbb E}_{{\bf n} \in {\bf Z}^d \cap P} f(\psi_1({\bf n})) \dots f(\psi_t({\bf n}))} for various affine-linear forms {\psi_1,\dots,\psi_t} when the functions {f} are given by irrational nilsequences.

The combination of the two theorems is then used to address various questions in additive combinatorics.

There are no direct issues with the arithmetic regularity lemma. However, it turns out that the arithmetic counting lemma is only true if one imposes an additional property (which we call the “flag property”) on the affine-linear forms {\psi_1,\dots,\psi_t}. Without this property, there does not appear to be a clean asymptotic formula for these averages if the only hypothesis one places on the underlying nilsequences is irrationality. Thus when trying to understand the asymptotics of averages involving linear forms that do not obey the flag property, the paradigm of understanding these averages via a combination of the regularity lemma and a counting lemma seems to require some significant revision (in particular, one would probably have to replace the existing regularity lemma with some variant, despite the fact that the lemma is still technically true in this setting). Fortunately, for most applications studied to date (including the important subclass of translation-invariant affine forms), the flag property holds; however our claim in the paper to have resolved a conjecture of Gowers and Wolf on the true complexity of systems of affine forms must now be narrowed, as our methods only verify this conjecture under the assumption of the flag property.

In a bit more detail: the asymptotic formula for our counting lemma involved some finite-dimensional vector spaces {\Psi^{[i]}} for various natural numbers {i}, defined as the linear span of the vectors {(\psi^i_1({\bf n}), \dots, \psi^i_t({\bf n}))} as {{\bf n}} ranges over the parameter space {{\bf Z}^d}. Roughly speaking, these spaces encode some constraints one would expect to see amongst the forms {\psi^i_1({\bf n}), \dots, \psi^i_t({\bf n})}. For instance, in the case of length four arithmetic progressions when {d=2}, {{\bf n} = (n,r)}, and

\displaystyle  \psi_i({\bf n}) = n + (i-1)r

for {i=1,2,3,4}, then {\Psi^{[1]}} is spanned by the vectors {(1,1,1,1)} and {(1,2,3,4)} and can thus be described as the two-dimensional linear space

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[1]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): a-2b+c = b-2c+d = 0\} \ \ \ \ \ (1)

while {\Psi^{[2]}} is spanned by the vectors {(1,1,1,1)}, {(1,2,3,4)}, {(1^2,2^2,3^2,4^2)} and can be described as the hyperplane

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[2]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): a-3b+3c-d = 0 \}. \ \ \ \ \ (2)

As a special case of the counting lemma, we can check that if {f} takes the form {f(n) = F( \alpha n, \beta n^2 + \gamma n)} for some irrational {\alpha,\beta \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, some arbitrary {\gamma \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}}, and some smooth {F: {\bf R}/{\bf Z} \times {\bf R}/{\bf Z} \rightarrow {\bf C}}, then the limiting value of the average

\displaystyle  {\bf E}_{n, r \in [N]} f(n) f(n+r) f(n+2r) f(n+3r)

as {N \rightarrow \infty} is equal to

\displaystyle  \int_{a_1,b_1,c_1,d_1 \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: a_1-2b_1+c_1=b_1-2c_1+d_1=0} \int_{a_2,b_2,c_2,d_2 \in {\bf R}/{\bf Z}: a_2-3b_2+3c_2-d_2=0}

\displaystyle  F(a_1,a_2) F(b_1,b_2) F(c_1,c_2) F(d_1,d_2)

which reflects the constraints

\displaystyle  \alpha n - 2 \alpha(n+r) + \alpha(n+2r) = \alpha(n+r) - 2\alpha(n+2r)+\alpha(n+3r)=0

and

\displaystyle  (\beta n^2 + \gamma n) - 3 (\beta(n+r)^2+\gamma(n+r))

\displaystyle + 3 (\beta(n+2r)^2 +\gamma(n+2r)) - (\beta(n+3r)^2+\gamma(n+3r))=0.

These constraints follow from the descriptions (1), (2), using the containment {\Psi^{[1]} \subset \Psi^{[2]}} to dispense with the lower order term {\gamma n} (which then plays no further role in the analysis).

The arguments in our paper turn out to be perfectly correct under the assumption of the “flag property” that {\Psi^{[i]} \subset \Psi^{[i+1]}} for all {i}. The problem is that the flag property turns out to not always hold. A counterexample, provided by Daniel Altman, involves the four linear forms

\displaystyle  \psi_1(n,r) = r; \psi_2(n,r) = 2n+2r; \psi_3(n,r) = n+3r; \psi_4(n,r) = n.

Here it turns out that

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[1]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): d-c=3a; b-2a=2d\}

and

\displaystyle  \Psi^{[2]} = \{ (a,b,c,d): 24a+3b-4c-8d=0 \}

and {\Psi^{[1]}} is no longer contained in {\Psi^{[2]}}. The analogue of the asymptotic formula given previously for {f(n) = F( \alpha n, \beta n^2 + \gamma n)} is then valid when {\gamma} vanishes, but not when {\gamma} is non-zero, because the identity

\displaystyle  24 (\beta \psi_1(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_1(n,r)) + 3 (\beta \psi_2(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_2(n,r))

\displaystyle - 4 (\beta \psi_3(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_3(n,r)) - 8 (\beta \psi_4(n,r)^2 + \gamma \psi_4(n,r)) = 0

holds in the former case but not the latter. Thus the output of any purported arithmetic regularity lemma in this case is now sensitive to the lower order terms of the nilsequence and cannot be described in a uniform fashion for all “irrational” sequences. There should still be some sort of formula for the asymptotics from the general equidistribution theory of nilsequences, but it could be considerably more complicated than what is presented in this paper.

Fortunately, the flag property does hold in several key cases, most notably the translation invariant case when {\Psi^{[1]}} contains {(1,\dots,1)}, as well as “complexity one” cases. Nevertheless non-flag property systems of affine forms do exist, thus limiting the range of applicability of the techniques in this paper. In particular, the conjecture of Gowers and Wolf (Theorem 1.13 in the paper) is now open again in the non-flag property case.

Several years ago, I developed a public lecture on the cosmic distance ladder in astronomy from a historical perspective (and emphasising the role of mathematics in building the ladder). I previously blogged about the lecture here; the most recent version of the slides can be found here. Recently, I have begun working with Tanya Klowden (a long time friend with a background in popular writing on a variety of topics, including astronomy) to expand the lecture into a popular science book, with the tentative format being non-technical chapters interspersed with some more mathematical sections to give some technical details. We are still in the middle of the writing process, but we have produced a sample chapter (which deals with what we call the “fourth rung” of the distance ladder – the distances and orbits of the planets – and how the work of Copernicus, Brahe, Kepler and others led to accurate measurements of these orbits, as well as Kepler’s famous laws of planetary motion). As always, any feedback on the chapter is welcome. (Due to various pandemic-related uncertainties, we do not have a definite target deadline for when the book will be completed, but presumably this will occur sometime in the next year.)

The book is currently under contract with Yale University Press. My coauthor Tanya Klowden can be reached at tklowden@gmail.com.

Rachel Greenfeld and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our paper “The structure of translational tilings in {{\bf Z}^d}“. This paper studies the tilings {1_F * 1_A = 1} of a finite tile {F} in a standard lattice {{\bf Z}^d}, that is to say sets {A \subset {\bf Z}^d} (which we call tiling sets) such that every element of {{\bf Z}^d} lies in exactly one of the translates {a+F, a \in A} of {F}. We also consider more general tilings of level {k} {1_F * 1_A = k} for a natural number {k} (several of our results consider an even more general setting in which {1_F * 1_A} is periodic but allowed to be non-constant).

In many cases the tiling set {A} will be periodic (by which we mean translation invariant with respect to some lattice (a finite index subgroup) of {{\bf Z}^d}). For instance one simple example of a tiling is when {F \subset {\bf Z}^2} is the unit square {F = \{0,1\}^2} and {A} is the lattice {2{\bf Z}^2 = \{ 2x: x \in {\bf Z}^2\}}. However one can modify some tilings to make them less periodic. For instance, keeping {F = \{0,1\}^2} one also has the tiling set

\displaystyle  A = \{ (2x, 2y+a(x)): x,y \in {\bf Z} \}

where {a: {\bf Z} \rightarrow \{0,1\}} is an arbitrary function. This tiling set is periodic in a single direction {(0,2)}, but is not doubly periodic. For the slightly modified tile {F = \{0,1\} \times \{0,2\}}, the set

\displaystyle  A = \{ (2x, 4y+2a(x)): x,y \in {\bf Z} \} \cup \{ (2x+b(y), 4y+1): x,y \in {\bf Z}\}

for arbitrary {a,b: {\bf Z} \rightarrow \{0,1\}} can be verified to be a tiling set, which in general will not exhibit any periodicity whatsoever; however, it is weakly periodic in the sense that it is the disjoint union of finitely many sets, each of which is periodic in one direction.

The most well known conjecture in this area is the Periodic Tiling Conjecture:

Conjecture 1 (Periodic tiling conjecture) If a finite tile {F \subset {\bf Z}^d} has at least one tiling set, then it has a tiling set which is periodic.

This conjecture was stated explicitly by Lagarias and Wang, and also appears implicitly in this text of Grunbaum and Shepard. In one dimension {d=1} there is a simple pigeonhole principle argument of Newman that shows that all tiling sets are in fact periodic, which certainly implies the periodic tiling conjecture in this case. The {d=2} case was settled more recently by Bhattacharya, but the higher dimensional cases {d > 2} remain open in general.

We are able to obtain a new proof of Bhattacharya’s result that also gives some quantitative bounds on the periodic tiling set, which are polynomial in the diameter of the set if the cardinality {|F|} of the tile is bounded:

Theorem 2 (Quantitative periodic tiling in {{\bf Z}^2}) If a finite tile {F \subset {\bf Z}^2} has at least one tiling set, then it has a tiling set which is {M{\bf Z}^2}-periodic for some {M \ll_{|F|} \mathrm{diam}(F)^{O(|F|^4)}}.

Among other things, this shows that the problem of deciding whether a given subset of {{\bf Z}^2} of bounded cardinality tiles {{\bf Z}^2} or not is in the NP complexity class with respect to the diameter {\mathrm{diam}(F)}. (Even the decidability of this problem was not known until the result of Bhattacharya.)

We also have a closely related structural theorem:

Theorem 3 (Quantitative weakly periodic tiling in {{\bf Z}^2}) Every tiling set of a finite tile {F \subset {\bf Z}^2} is weakly periodic. In fact, the tiling set is the union of at most {|F|-1} disjoint sets, each of which is periodic in a direction of magnitude {O_{|F|}( \mathrm{diam}(F)^{O(|F|^2)})}.

We also have a new bound for the periodicity of tilings in {{\bf Z}}:

Theorem 4 (Universal period for tilings in {{\bf Z}}) Let {F \subset {\bf Z}} be finite, and normalized so that {0 \in F}. Then every tiling set of {F} is {qn}-periodic, where {q} is the least common multiple of all primes up to {2|F|}, and {n} is the least common multiple of the magnitudes {|f|} of all {f \in F \backslash \{0\}}.

We remark that the current best complexity bound of determining whether a subset of {{\bf Z}} tiles {{\bf Z}} or not is {O( \exp(\mathrm{diam}(F)^{1/3+o(1)}))}, due to Biro. It may be that the results in this paper can improve upon this bound, at least for tiles of bounded cardinality.

On the other hand, we discovered a genuine difference between level one tiling and higher level tiling, by locating a counterexample to the higher level analogue of (the qualitative version of) Theorem 3:

Theorem 5 (Counterexample) There exists an eight-element subset {F \subset {\bf Z}^2} and a level {4} tiling {1_F * 1_A = 4} such that {A} is not weakly periodic.

We do not know if there is a corresponding counterexample to the higher level periodic tiling conjecture (that if {F} tiles {{\bf Z}^d} at level {k}, then there is a periodic tiling at the same level {k}). Note that it is important to keep the level fixed, since one trivially always has a periodic tiling at level {|F|} from the identity {1_F * 1 = |F|}.

The methods of Bhattacharya used the language of ergodic theory. Our investigations also originally used ergodic-theoretic and Fourier-analytic techniques, but we ultimately found combinatorial methods to be more effective in this problem (and in particular led to quite strong quantitative bounds). The engine powering all of our results is the following remarkable fact, valid in all dimensions:

Lemma 6 (Dilation lemma) Suppose that {A} is a tiling of a finite tile {F \subset {\bf Z}^d}. Then {A} is also a tiling of the dilated tile {rF} for any {r} coprime to {n}, where {n} is the least common multiple of all the primes up to {|F|}.

Versions of this dilation lemma have previously appeared in work of Tijdeman and of Bhattacharya. We sketch a proof here. By the fundamental theorem of arithmetic and iteration it suffices to establish the case where {r} is a prime {p>|F|}. We need to show that {1_{pF} * 1_A = 1}. It suffices to show the claim {1_{pF} * 1_A = 1 \hbox{ mod } p}, since both sides take values in {\{0,\dots,|F|\} \subset \{0,\dots,p-1\}}. The convolution algebra {{\bf F}_p[{\bf Z}^d]} (or group algebra) of finitely supported functions from {{\bf Z}^d} to {{\bf F}_p} is a commutative algebra of characteristic {p}, so we have the Frobenius identity {(f+g)^{*p} = f^{*p} + g^{*p}} for any {f,g}. As a consequence we see that {1_{pF} = 1_F^{*p} \hbox{ mod } p}. The claim now follows by convolving the identity {1_F * 1_A = 1 \hbox{ mod } p} by {p-1} further copies of {1_F}.

In our paper we actually establish a more general version of the dilation lemma that can handle tilings of higher level or of a periodic set, and this stronger version is useful to get the best quantitative results, but for simplicity we focus attention just on the above simple special case of the dilation lemma.

By averaging over all {r} in an arithmetic progression, one already gets a useful structural theorem for tilings in any dimension, which appears to be new despite being an easy consequence of Lemma 6:

Corollary 7 (Structure theorem for tilings) Suppose that {A} is a tiling of a finite tile {F \subset {\bf Z}^d}, where we normalize {0 \in F}. Then we have a decomposition

\displaystyle  1_A = 1 - \sum_{f \in F \backslash 0} \varphi_f \ \ \ \ \ (1)

where each {\varphi_f: {\bf Z}^d \rightarrow [0,1]} is a function that is periodic in the direction {nf}, where {n} is the least common multiple of all the primes up to {|F|}.

Proof: From Lemma 6 we have {1_A = 1 - \sum_{f \in F \backslash 0} \delta_{rf} * 1_A} for any {r = 1 \hbox{ mod } n}, where {\delta_{rf}} is the Kronecker delta at {rf}. Now average over {r} (extracting a weak limit or generalised limit as necessary) to obtain the conclusion. \Box

The identity (1) turns out to impose a lot of constraints on the functions {\varphi_f}, particularly in one and two dimensions. On one hand, one can work modulo {1} to eliminate the {1_A} and {1} terms to obtain the equation

\displaystyle  \sum_{f \in F \backslash 0} \varphi_f = 0 \hbox{ mod } 1

which in two dimensions in particular puts a lot of structure on each individual {\varphi_f} (roughly speaking it makes the {\varphi_f \hbox{ mod } 1} behave in a polynomial fashion, after collecting commensurable terms). On the other hand we have the inequality

\displaystyle  \sum_{f \in F \backslash 0} \varphi_f \leq 1 \ \ \ \ \ (2)

which can be used to exclude “equidistributed” polynomial behavior after a certain amount of combinatorial analysis. Only a small amount of further argument is then needed to conclude Theorem 3 and Theorem 2.

For level {k} tilings the analogue of (2) becomes

\displaystyle  \sum_{f \in F \backslash 0} \varphi_f \leq k

which is a significantly weaker inequality and now no longer seems to prohibit “equidistributed” behavior. After some trial and error we were able to come up with a completely explicit example of a tiling that actually utilises equidistributed polynomials; indeed the tiling set we ended up with was a finite boolean combination of Bohr sets.

We are currently studying what this machinery can tell us about tilings in higher dimensions, focusing initially on the three-dimensional case.

Asgar Jamneshan and I have just uploaded to the arXiv our paper “Foundational aspects of uncountable measure theory: Gelfand duality, Riesz representation, canonical models, and canonical disintegration“. This paper arose from our longer-term project to systematically develop “uncountable” ergodic theory – ergodic theory in which the groups acting are not required to be countable, the probability spaces one acts on are not required to be standard Borel, or Polish, and the compact groups that arise in the structural theory (e.g., the theory of group extensions) are not required to be separable. One of the motivations of doing this is to allow ergodic theory results to be applied to ultraproducts of finite dynamical systems, which can then hopefully be transferred to establish combinatorial results with good uniformity properties. An instance of this is the uncountable Mackey-Zimmer theorem, discussed in this companion blog post.

In the course of this project, we ran into the obstacle that many foundational results, such as the Riesz representation theorem, often require one or more of these countability hypotheses when encountered in textbooks. Other technical issues also arise in the uncountable setting, such as the need to distinguish the Borel {\sigma}-algebra from the (two different types of) Baire {\sigma}-algebra. As such we needed to spend some time reviewing and synthesizing the known literature on some foundational results of “uncountable” measure theory, which led to this paper. As such, most of the results of this paper are already in the literature, either explicitly or implicitly, in one form or another (with perhaps the exception of the canonical disintegration, which we discuss below); we view the main contribution of this paper as presenting the results in a coherent and unified fashion. In particular we found that the language of category theory was invaluable in clarifying and organizing all the different results. In subsequent work we (and some other authors) will use the results in this paper for various applications in uncountable ergodic theory.

The foundational results covered in this paper can be divided into a number of subtopics (Gelfand duality, Baire {\sigma}-algebras and Riesz representation, canonical models, and canonical disintegration), which we discuss further below the fold.

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